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Im wondering how I can get a reference to a types constructor to pass the function as a value. Basically, I would like to have a generic type registry that would allow instances to be created by calling a member function of a generic type registry instance.

For example:

class GeometryTypeInfo
{        
    constructor (public typeId: number, public typeName: string, public fnCtor: (...args: any[]) => IGeometry) {
    }
    createInstance(...args: any[]) : IGeometry { return this.fnCtor(args); }
    }
}

Later:

class Point implements IGeometry {
    constructor(public x: number, public y: number) { }

    public static type_info = new GeometryTypeInfo(1, 'POINT', Point); // <- fails
    // also fails: 
    //    new GeometryTypeInfo(1, 'POINT', new Point);
    //    new GeometryTypeInfo(1, 'POINT', Point.prototype);
    //    new GeometryTypeInfo(1, 'POINT', Point.bind(this));
}

Anyone know if it is possible to reference a classes constructor function?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use the constructor type literal or an object type literal with a construct signature to describe the type of a constructor (see, generally, section 3.5 of the language spec). To use your example, the following should work:

interface IGeometry {
    x: number;
    y: number;
}

class GeometryTypeInfo
{        
    constructor (public typeId: number, public typeName: string, public fnCtor: new (...args: any[]) => IGeometry) {
    }
    createInstance(...args: any[]) : IGeometry { return new this.fnCtor(args); }
}

class Point implements IGeometry {
    constructor(public x: number, public y: number) { }

    public static type_info = new GeometryTypeInfo(1, 'POINT', Point); // <- fails
}

Notice the constructor type literal in GenometryTypeInfo's constructor parameter list, and the new call in the implementation of createInstance.

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Thanks, I missed the 'new' literal in the spec. –  Jake Heidt Oct 8 '12 at 18:34

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