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What is the difference between *x=i and x=&i?

Code:

int i=2;
int *x;

*x=i; //what is the difference between this...
x=&i; //...and this??

//Also, what happens when I do these? Not really important but curious.
x=i;
*x=*i;
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8 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

*x=i; //what is the difference between this...

This assigns the value of i to an integer stored at the address pointed to by x

x=&i; //...and this??

This assigns the address of i to x.

Note that in your example x is unassigned, so the behavior of *x=i is undefined.

Here is a better illustration:

int i = 2, j = 5;
printf("%d %d\n", i, j); // Prints 2 5
int *x = &j;
*x = i;
printf("%d %d\n", i, j); // Prints 2 2
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ok so int *x=NULL; will fix that right? –  ritratt Oct 8 '12 at 18:35
    
@ritratt After that, the behaviour of *x=i is still undefined because you're not allowed to dereference a null pointer. –  hvd Oct 8 '12 at 18:36
    
value of j changed without directly accessing the variable j. Mind blown. –  ritratt Oct 8 '12 at 18:40
    
Hey btw, are you sure it is int *x = &j; and not int *x; x=&j? –  ritratt Oct 8 '12 at 19:00
1  
@ritratt The latest version of the compiler should allow both; I tried this syntax on ideone (link) and it worked as expected. –  dasblinkenlight Oct 8 '12 at 19:01
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int i=2;
int *x;

*x=i; // x is not initialized, this is undefined behavior
x=&i; // this assigns the address of i to x 

and

*x=&i; // is invalid C. You cannot assign a pointer to an
       // integer without an explicit conversion.
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*x=i changes the value stored in the memory location pointed to by x to be equal to the value stored in i.

x=&i changes the memory location x is pointing to to i's memory location.

x=i is wrong. You will most likely get a segfault.

*x=*i is wrong. You cannot dereference i, because i is not a pointer.

*x=&i (actually, more properly, *x=(int)&i) will store the memory location of i as an integer in the memory location pointed to by x.

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*x=i; dereferences the pointer x and assigns i.

x=&i makes the pointer x point at the variable i.

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*x = i changes the value stored at the address which is stored in x. In your case, unedited, that will crash, because the address x is likely junk, possibly NULL. You would need a malloc() or new or something.

x = &i changes the address stored in x, so that is is the address of the variable i. This is perfectly safe in your example.

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Well, when you say

*x = i

You're saying: make the variable x points to the value i. When you say

x = &i

You're saying make the address x points to the address of i. And I guess you should be able to figure the other ones out by yourself!

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*x = i This actually assigns the value of i to the memory location pointed to by x.

x = &i This assigns the address of variable i to a pointer variable x. x should be a pointer.

When you do x = i, this will give you a runtime error, as you are trying to erroneously assign an address(which in this case is 2) which does not belong to the address space of your process. To successfully do this, i should also be a pointer and must point to an address which is in your address space.

When you do *x = *i, in your case will again give an error. If i is a pointer, then the address pointed to by x will get the value present at the address pointed to by i.

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*x = i assigns 2 to the memory address pointed to by x. Note that this would probably crash because x hasn't been initialized to a memory address via malloc or an assignment to a buffer or address of a stack variable.

x = &i assigns the pointer x to the address of variable i.

x = i would assign the pointer x to the value of 2, which would most likely point to an invalid memory address and would require a cast.

*x = *i would depend on the current value of x. And since i is not a pointer you cannot dereference it.

*x = &i would write the address of i to the memory address pointed to by x, which would depend on the code preceding it. It would likely crash if you didn't assign x to a valid address.

Some of these calls would require a cast to be syntactically correct.

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