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I'm trying to write an octal to decimal conversion app.

The problem is the return value is 1 less than it should be, ex.:

INPUT: 2426 (OCT)

SHOULD RETURN: 1302 (DEC)

RETURNS: 1301 (DEC)

Any ideas what's wrong? I'm using newest Code::Blocks if someone wants to know.

Here's my code:

int oct2dec (int number) {
    int system  = 8;
    int length  = IntegerLength(number);
    int power   = length - 1;
    int result  = 0;
    int partial = 0;

    do {
        partial = part_nr(number);
        cout<<"czastka: "<<partial<<endl;
        result = result + (partial * pow(system,power));
        number = number - (partial * pow(10,power));
        power--;

    } while (number>0);
    return result; 
}

part_nr function:

int part_nr(int number) {
    int multipler = 1;
    int result    = 0;
    do {
        int temp=number/multipler;
        if(temp<10) result = temp;
        multipler = multipler*10;
    } while (result == 0);
    return result;
}

IntegerLength function:

int IntegerLength(int value) {
   int divisor = 10;
   int length  = 1;
   while(value >= divisor)
   {
     value = (value - (value % divisor)) / divisor;
     length ++;
   }

   return length;
}

(btw. I've translated variables from my native lang to english, so if you see any non-eng variable say so, i'll correct it)

share|improve this question
    
Pardon my ignorance but is IntegerLength() supposed to return the number of digits of an integer? –  mcoimbra Oct 8 '12 at 18:40
    
I tried it and it worked out for me. –  imreal Oct 8 '12 at 18:42
    
@mcoimbra yes, for example input it returns 4. Also (at)Nicolas Arroyo: I dont get it, i've even tried to rewrite it in new file and it still returns wrong result :/. Code::Blocks error? –  user1709804 Oct 8 '12 at 18:49
    
I did it on g++, try it with that. –  imreal Oct 8 '12 at 18:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have tested your code and it is outputting the value you claim to be expected. The only problem I encountered was with rounding. I changed the pow() function call to powf(), and then I cast the result of that function to integer.

This is the code I tested (VS2010 C++ Project):

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>    
using namespace std;

int part_nr(int number) {
  int multipler = 1;
  int result    = 0;
  do {
    int temp=number/multipler;
    if(temp<10) result = temp;
    multipler = multipler*10;
  } while (result == 0);
  return result;
}


int IntegerLength(int value) {
   int divisor = 10;
   int length  = 1;
   while(value >= divisor)
   {
     value = (value - (value % divisor)) / divisor;
     length++;
   }
   return length;
}

int oct2dec (int number) {
  int system  = 8;
  int length  = IntegerLength(number);
  int power   = length - 1;
  int result  = 0;
  int partial = 0;

  do {
    partial = part_nr(number);
    cout<<"czastka: "<<partial<< endl;
    result = result + (partial * (int)powf(system,power));
    number = number - (partial * (int)powf(10,power));
    power--;

  } while (number>0);
  return result; 
}





int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
  int res = oct2dec(2426);
  cout << "res is " << res << endl;
  getchar();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, I just compiled it in VS C++ Express and it worked, strange :| –  user1709804 Oct 8 '12 at 18:55
    
Have you tried in CodeBlocks with the slight change I made? –  mcoimbra Oct 8 '12 at 19:03
    
Yes, just did. It works now. So It was rounding problem. I gonna take closer look to powf() function and to user883617's solution. Thanks for anserws. –  user1709804 Oct 8 '12 at 19:21

I'd think you just have problems with rounding in you algorithm. Anyway, this is not the way to do the conversion anyway: on the way in, you just read the digit and add it to the current value. If there is another digit, you multiply by 8 and reapeat.

On the way out, you take the remainder (modulus) of the division by 10 to form the next digit. Then you divide by 10 and while the result is non-zero you repeat.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, calling std::pow as the question does is definitely not a recommended approach. –  Ben Voigt Oct 8 '12 at 18:50

You can do this much easier than what you are trying to. For example:

unsigned int oct2dec(unsigned int oct) {
    int dec = 0, m = 1;

    while (oct > 0) {
        dec += m * (oct % 10);
        oct /= 10;
        m *= 8;
    }
    return dec;
}
share|improve this answer

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