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I would like to have a ComboBox displaying some different line styles, such as solid, dotted, dashed etc.

How to create a custom render to accomplish this?

Thanks all.

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1  
What have you tried? You could use a JPanel as a renderer and paint your line in the panel, or you could use ImageIcons representing each line and use a subclass of DefaultListCellRenderer. – JB Nizet Oct 8 '12 at 19:06
    
Hi JB Nizet,can you provide with some line codes as example? – Alberto acepsut Oct 8 '12 at 19:10
    
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The good way to do this is to use a CustomRenderer. You can either use predefined images or paint the line stroke on the fly. Here is an example of the latter option:

import java.awt.BasicStroke;
import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Graphics2D;
import java.awt.GridBagLayout;
import java.awt.Stroke;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

import javax.swing.JComboBox;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JList;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.ListCellRenderer;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class TestComboBox {

    private static enum LineType {

        PLAIN {
            @Override
            public Stroke getStroke() {
                return new BasicStroke(1.0f, BasicStroke.CAP_SQUARE, BasicStroke.JOIN_MITER, 1.0f, new float[] { 1.0f }, 1);
            }
        },
        DOTTED {
            @Override
            public Stroke getStroke() {
                return new BasicStroke(1.0f, BasicStroke.CAP_SQUARE, BasicStroke.JOIN_MITER, 1.0f, new float[] { 0.1f, 5.0f }, 1);
            }

        },
        DASHED {
            @Override
            public Stroke getStroke() {
                return new BasicStroke(1.0f, BasicStroke.CAP_SQUARE, BasicStroke.JOIN_MITER, 1.0f, new float[] { 3.0f, 3.0f }, 1);
            }

        };
        public abstract Stroke getStroke();
    }

    public class LineRenderer extends JPanel implements ListCellRenderer {
        private LineType value;

        @Override
        public Component getListCellRendererComponent(JList list, Object value, int index, boolean isSelected, boolean cellHasFocus) {
            if (value instanceof LineType) {
                setLineType((LineType) value);
            } else {
                setLineType(null);
            }
            return this;
        }

        @Override
        protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);
            Graphics2D g2d = (Graphics2D) g;
            if (value != null) {
                g2d.setStroke(value.getStroke());
                g.drawLine(0, getHeight() / 2, getWidth(), getHeight() / 2);
            }

        }

        private void setLineType(LineType value) {
            this.value = value;
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
            return new Dimension(50, 20);
        }

    }

    protected void initUI() {
        final JFrame frame = new JFrame(TestComboBox.class.getSimpleName());
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        JPanel panel = new JPanel(new GridBagLayout());
        final JComboBox comboBox = new JComboBox(LineType.values());
        comboBox.setRenderer(new LineRenderer());
        comboBox.setSelectedItem(null);
        comboBox.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(comboBox, "You have selected " + comboBox.getSelectedItem());
                    }
                });
            }
        });
        panel.add(comboBox);
        frame.add(panel);
        frame.setSize(300, 100);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws ClassNotFoundException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException,
            UnsupportedLookAndFeelException {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                new TestComboBox().initUI();
            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@ Guillaume Polet Wonderful, great work, thank you very much! – Alberto acepsut Oct 9 '12 at 6:19

Take a look at this answer that I gave for a custom JComboBox editor. In that solution, I extended the BasicComboBoxEditor class, modified the editing component and used a new instance of that in setEditor().

Similarly, you can extend BasicComboBoxRenderer, modify the borders of the rendering component as you wish, then use setRenderer() to set a new instance of it to your JComboBox.

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2  
You really shouldn't be using UI delegate code to perform this task. That's what the ComboBoxEditor and ListCellRenderer interfaces are for. Using something like BasicComboBoxRenderer in this manner could compromise the applications look and feel – MadProgrammer Oct 8 '12 at 20:16

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