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My Question: How can I design the described classes in a better way without worrying about data integrity?

I have a class Player-Container and Player. The Player-Container is more or less a centralised Player "Data-Container" for lots of Threads they all have the pointer to this class. The TBB library offers a locking mechanism for read-only and write. I have some Pseudo Code to reflect my current Design:

Class: Player-Container 
Method: CreatePlayer, RemovePlayer , LoginUser, VerifyUser

Class: Player
Method: None its a pure data container

Now for me the more I develop it seems wrong to have those functionalities on the "Top-Level-Container" but I seem not to come around this because the container will ensure that I can lock the object so that no parallel accesses can modify the user(eg. User Builds something and sends this request twice and resources get reduced twice instead of once).

What I would like to have:

Class: Player-Container
Method: CreatePlayer, RemovePlayer

Class: Player
Method: LoginUser, VerifyUser,....

My issue, how do I achieve that and still be data integrity save, should I just use the hash_map as "index" and build a "Player" level locking? It would be cool to have some inputs and suggestions. What bugs me most is that the PlayerContainer actually needs to know so much about the Player Class, if I change an attribute I have to recode a lot in the Container.

If something seems not clear please ask.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It sounds like you really have two questions here design & locking and there is pretty clearly some design tension here around encapsulation and cohesion.

From a user of the api it certainly seems nice to want to have to only deal with the 'Player-Container' class to add / remove / login players.

I would consider keeping the front facing methods on the Player-Container to keep things simple. However I would also probably add helper classes or helper functions to implement those to ensure that there was very little code inside the Player-Container classes. You could also add these as methods to the player class if you felt like it.

If you haven't read this article from Scott Meyer's on where to put a function, its probably worth your time.

The second question is on locking, i.e. where should locks go on the container or on the player class.

There are choices here, but remember you need to synchronize both the container and the data in the individual class. So if you use a concurrent container to hold the players and avoid a heavyweight lock on the player container class, you will definitely need to ensure that the player classes are synchronized, particularly if you allow multiple threads to operate on the same player.

Take care if you do this, it may make more sense to lock not the individual methods on a player, but rather the entire player to make sure that you don't interleave functionality that isn't compatible, i.e. you really don't want LoginUser to be running concurrently with RemoveUser on the same user, you probably want them to serialize and run one after the other.

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Thanks for your solution Rick, the TBB Library will lock the "Player" record depending on if you want to read or read/write at the moment the Player-Container will have for example "LoginUser" but only acquire the lock by retrieving the record and after that call a method on the player to actually verify the password(Thats why it seemed strange, i only used the Player-Cargo to lock the objects and be able to release them properly after function execution) but maybe it is the right thing to do. –  Oliver Stutz Oct 9 '12 at 3:44
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I don't know about the particular features of the TBB library, but in general you could build something like a class SharedObject<Player> to expose Player instances along with a lock object (e.g. a read/write mutex) that can be solely accessed using a SharedObjectAccessor object that deals with applying the lock properly.

template<typename T>
class SharedObjectAccessor;

template<typename T>
class SharedObject
{
public:
    SharedObject(const T& initial = T())
    : managedObject(initial)
    {}

private:
    friend class SharedObjectAccessor<T>;

    const T& read() const { return managedObject; }
    T& write() { return managedObject; }
    ReadWriteMutex lock;
    T managedObject;
};

template<typename T>
class SharedObjectAccessor
{
public:
    SharedObjectAccessor(SharedObject<T>& ref)
    : sharedObject(ref)
    {}

    ~SharedObjectAccessor() { sharedObject.lock.unlock(); }

    const T& get() const
    {
        sharedObject.lock.lock_read();
        return sharedObject.read();
    }

    T& set()
    {
        sharedObject.lock.lock_write();
        return sharedObject.write();
    }

private:
    mutable SharedObject<T>& sharedObject;
};
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This is actually already in place, the tbb datastructure provides a read / write accessors to actually modify the objects in the data-structure. Thanks for providing an example it might come in handy whenever I don't have tbb. –  Oliver Stutz Oct 9 '12 at 3:55
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