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I have one-producer-one-consumer model, in which I need for the producer to set a flag when data is available. I suspect I can get away without a lock on the shared flag because:

  • The producer never checks the value before setting
  • Missing an update to the flag occasionally is not a problem (though I could probably also avoid this using atomic operations?).

So my question is, how do I implement this? My understanding of the volatile keyword, and things like __sync_synchronize() are tenuous at best, so assume I know very little. Specifically, I'm looking to be able to make sure that a change to the flag is visible in the other thread in a timely fashion.

Edit: I'm using GCC on Linux.

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Test and Set instruction? penguin.cz/~literakl/intel/b.html#BTS Should be not too hard with a little inline assembly. –  Wug Oct 8 '12 at 19:49
    
Dunno. Does that allow me to assume anything about visibility in the other thread? Or would the compiler be allowed to use a local copy of the flag in--say--the producer thread? Also, GCC has builtins for atomic operations. –  brooks94 Oct 8 '12 at 19:50
    
It's designed for the purpose, so it should be fast. Theoretically. I've never had to write software that used it myself, I just know it exists. –  Wug Oct 8 '12 at 19:53
2  
In C11, use the atomic_flag variable type and the atomic_flag_test_and_set function. See 7.17.8.1 for details. –  Kerrek SB Oct 8 '12 at 20:06
    
@KerrekSB, that's great, I hadn't seen that before. Thanks. Is there a way to simulate that in C99, I don't think I'm using a recent enough build of GCC. –  brooks94 Oct 8 '12 at 20:39

4 Answers 4

Use two variables:

volatile size_t elements_produced; // producer increments it when data is available
volatile size_t elements_consumed; // consumer increments it

new data is available exactly when elements_produced != elements_consumed. If you need an infinite amount then in addition mod it on updating.

produce(...) {
    elements_produced = (elements_produced + 1) % (max_elements_in_queue + 1);
}

consume(...) {
    elements_consumed = (elements_consumed + 1) % (max_elements_in_queue + 1);
}

no need for locks or atomics.

This is the standard implementation of single-producer, single-consumer circular ring buffers.

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"no need for locks or atomics" This is incorrect. There is still a concurrency problem here when produce is called from two threads at the same time. Each thread could read the same initial value for elements_produced. The first thread's output would be overwritten by the second, and the end result is the variable being incremented once instead of twice. This only works if you can ensure that only one thread is calling that function at a time, which would necessitate some sort of lock. –  bta Oct 8 '12 at 20:27
1  
@bta Except that in the OP's case, there is only one producer and one consumer. –  Ioan Oct 8 '12 at 20:28
    
@bta True, my mistake. Unless the OP can specify accuracy, I usually don't care if I lag behind such a notification by a "check cycle". Only reads are performed concurrently. –  Ioan Oct 8 '12 at 20:32
    
@loan- Do we know that the producer and consumer are each single-threaded? –  bta Oct 8 '12 at 20:34
1  
OP here. Single producer thread, single consumer thread. –  brooks94 Oct 8 '12 at 20:36

Atomic operations means (ever so briefly) blocking other atomic operations until the first operation is accomplished.

I assume we're talking about threads hence we should be thinking of mutexes (but this goes for processes and semaphores as well). Mutexes (or semaphores) can be checked (read) without trying to acquire a lock.

If the state of the mutex (semaphore) is that it's already locked, carry on with other operations and try again later.

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It is not really possible to do this in a portable manner.

You can, however, use various compiler intrisics to implement it.

As an example, for gcc on x86(-64) and probably at least ARM:

static int queued_work;

static void inc_queued_work()
{
    (void)__sync_add_and_fetch( &queued_work, 1 );
}

/*
  Decrement queued_work if > 0.
  Returns 1 if queued_work was non-equal to 0 before
  this function was called.
*/
static int dec_queued_work()
{
    /* Read current value and subtract 1.
       If the result is equal to -1, add 1 back and return 0.
    */
    if( __sync_sub_and_fetch( &queued_work, 1 ) == -1 )
    {
        __sync_fetch_and_add( &queued_work, 1 );
        return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

Some CPU:s only support compare_and_swap. You can implement this using that intrisic as well:

/* Alternative solution using compare_and_swap  */
void inc_queued_work()
{
    do {
        int queued = queued_work;
        /* Try to write queued-1 to the variable. */
        if( __sync_bool_compare_and_swap( &queued_work,
                                         queued, queued+1 ) )
            return;
    } while( 1 );
}

int dec_queued_work()
{
    do {
        int queued = queued_work;
        if( !queued ) return 0;
        /* Try to write queued-1 to the variable. */
        if( __sync_bool_compare_and_swap( &queued_work, 
                                         queued, queued-1 ) )
            return queued;
    } while( 1 );
}

These functions should work even if you have multiple writers and readers. Applying google to 'sync_add_and_fetch' with friends will give you a lot of reference documentation

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Without locks the two threads will never synchronize and the consumer will spin forever waiting on a value that will never change (as that value is cached and the memory put/fetch will therefore never occur).

So to summarize, you must a) make sure that the memory was written to from the producer, and b) make sure the memory was read by the consumer. This is exactly what locks do, which is why you should use them. If your dead set against locking, you can use functions like sleep, which have guarantees on the state of cache after awakening.

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