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These days with HTML5 and CSS3, is the use of <br> tags frowned upon when margin/padding can be used?

EDIT: This is in regards to spacing between div elements for my use case, but general best practice advise is also welcome.

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I would generally suggest against using <br> tags. –  Shmiddty Oct 8 '12 at 19:53
    
If this isn't purely stylistic (e.g. separation of thoughts), you may be looking for <hr>, with custom styling (transparent, with height or margin for spacing). –  bfrohs Oct 8 '12 at 20:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

There are actually pretty well-defined rules around its usage, harking back to the days of HTML 2.0 when it was first introduced:

The <BR> element specifies a line break between words (see 6, "Characters, Words, and Paragraphs"). For example:

<P> Pease porridge hot<BR>
Pease porridge cold<BR>
Pease porridge in the pot<BR>
Nine days old.

The <br> element itself was never intended to be used to control margin/padding. Although they introduced a presentational clear attribute to HTML 3.2 to handle things like floating images, it was soon deprecated in HTML 4 and XHTML 1 in favor of CSS. That was almost 15 years ago, so it's really nothing new.

In HTML5, they've made it much clearer that <br> isn't intended for presentation or layout, with examples (and the clear attribute is obsolete):

br elements must be used only for line breaks that are actually part of the content, as in poems or addresses.

The following example is correct usage of the br element:

<p>P. Sherman<br>
42 Wallaby Way<br>
Sydney</p>

br elements must not be used for separating thematic groups in a paragraph.

The following examples are non-conforming, as they abuse the br element:

<p><a ...>34 comments.</a><br>
<a ...>Add a comment.</a></p>
<p><label>Name: <input name="name"></label><br>
<label>Address: <input name="address"></label></p>

Here are alternatives to the above, which are correct:

<p><a ...>34 comments.</a></p>
<p><a ...>Add a comment.</a></p>

<p><label>Name: <input name="name"></label></p>
<p><label>Address: <input name="address"></label></p>

So using <br> in lieu of CSS margins for layout purposes has always been frowned upon, at least by the people who wrote the specifications.

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The specification for HTML 5 is much more informative than the language reference: br elements must be used only for line breaks that are actually part of the content, as in poems or addresses. –  Quentin Oct 8 '12 at 19:57
    
@Quentin: Thanks for the link. The HTML5 spec has been a navigational nightmare for me for some reason and I wasn't able to locate that section. I'll update my answer. –  BoltClock Oct 8 '12 at 19:59

Depends whether you like working with line-height or margin/padding.

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If you're using line-height to get the effect of a margin, you're probably doing it wrong. –  Ryan Kinal Oct 8 '12 at 20:12

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