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I am currently building a blog from scratch for a website I'm building because my client asked me to do so as opposed to using a simple library. Each post is a dynamically created page and the file name is the date is was created (I've made sure to address the problem of posting more than one post a day).

The problem is that I have no idea how to make the "next post" button. The "previous post" button wouldn't be a problem since I could just link it to the most recent post during the current post's creation. My table in the database for the blog is as follows:

    num - auto increment post number
    date - date posted
    src - page location

I could rebuild the blog to be completely server-sided and just have one page for the blog that will cycle through each post. I don't really want to do that though since you couldn't send someone a direct link to an individual blog post. My other idea was to rename each page based on post number, but if we ever had to delete a post, that wouldn't work.

I really have no idea what to do. Neither of my solutions are optimal and they will both pose problems in the future.

Thanks in advance for any help.

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I just want to make sure I understand your problem... When the user makes a now blog post then that post is created and stored as an HTML document. The links to the previous and next posts are on that document? –  Sheena Oct 8 '12 at 19:59
    
@Sheena Correct. –  Shmoopy Oct 8 '12 at 20:12
1  
Add a placeholder for the next button (eg. an HTML comment: <!-- NEXT -->) and use a regular expression to replace it with a real link once the next post has been generated. –  deizel Oct 8 '12 at 20:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You write:

I could rebuild the blog to be completely server-sided and just have one page for the blog that will cycle through each post. I don't really want to do that though since you couldn't send someone a direct link to an individual blog post.

I strongly recommend using a database solution rather than creating static files with blog content in them. On the long run, it's much more flexible. If you want to delete a post, edit a post, move a post, it's just much more accessible if everything is easily accessible.

The problem you pose with not being able to direct link to blog posts can be easily circumvented: use GET-variables in your URL. If you have a PHP page to display blogposts, say, displaypost.php, you could add a variable to the end telling the page which post to display. Your url could then be: yoursite.com/displaypost.php?postid=12

That would also make your problem of linking to the previous and next posts much easier; simply check the database what the next id is, higher than the current one (or one lower).

In my opinion it's inevitable that you switch to a database-driven solution somewhere down the road - rather soon than later, to prevent having to do stuff twice.

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I knew I was supposed to use POST for security reasons, but I didn't know that was why. Thank you very much! I'll be sure to use this! –  Shmoopy Oct 8 '12 at 20:41

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