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I'm using JPA 2 with the Hibernate ver. 4.1.7.Final as JPA implementation. I'm also using Spring framework v. 3.1.2.RELEASE to be clear. And here is my problem.

I have written a method to add/update my User entity.

@Override
@Transactional
public void saveUser(UserForm userForm) {
    User user;

    if (userForm.getId() == null) { // new user
        user = new User();
        user.setCreationDate(new Date());
        entityManager.persist(user); // !!!
    } else {
        user = entityManager.find(User.class, userForm.getId());
    }

    user.setFirstName(userForm.getFirstName());
    user.setLastName(userForm.getLastName());
    user.setMiddleName(userForm.getMiddleName());

    user.setEmail(userForm.getEmail());

    user.setRole(entityManager.find(Role.class, 1));//TODO

    user.setLogin(userForm.getLogin());
    user.setPassword(userForm.getPassword1());

    entityManager.flush();
}

I'm testing addition of user (userForm.getId() == null). And the above code doesn't work, giving error:

javax.persistence.PersistenceException: org.hibernate.exception.ConstraintViolationException: Column 'first_name' cannot be null
at org.hibernate.ejb.AbstractEntityManagerImpl.convert(AbstractEntityManagerImpl.java:1377)
at org.hibernate.ejb.AbstractEntityManagerImpl.convert(AbstractEntityManagerImpl.java:1300)
at org.hibernate.ejb.AbstractEntityManagerImpl.convert(AbstractEntityManagerImpl.java:1306)
at org.hibernate.ejb.AbstractEntityManagerImpl.flush(AbstractEntityManagerImpl.java:989)
...

But. If I move call to persist() to the end before flush() all works fine:

@Override
@Transactional
public void saveUser(UserForm userForm) {
    User user;

    if (userForm.getId() == null) { // new user
        user = new User();
        user.setCreationDate(new Date());
    } else {
        user = entityManager.find(User.class, userForm.getId());
    }

    user.setFirstName(userForm.getFirstName());
    user.setLastName(userForm.getLastName());
    user.setMiddleName(userForm.getMiddleName());

    user.setEmail(userForm.getEmail());

    user.setRole(entityManager.find(Role.class, 1));//TODO

    user.setLogin(userForm.getLogin());
    user.setPassword(userForm.getPassword1());

    entityManager.persist(user);// !!!
    entityManager.flush();
}

I think what happens is in first (problem) case it tries to store the User object data existed at time of persist call, although the actual save executed during flush() (upd. Wrong. It tries to issue sql insert exactly at persist() call). What make me think this way is when I tried to debug I have found that it still tries to insert correct creation_date somewhere inside, but other values are nulls.

But I swear that in my other project I've been working on some years ago this worked just fine, though then I used Oracle instead of MySQL (I don't think this is the reason) and older versions of frameworks.

What could be the problem here? Maybe there is some configuration option for Hibernate affecting this?

Or this is the correct behaviour and my misunderstanding of JPA API?

UPD. I'm using

@Id
@GeneratedValue
@Column(columnDefinition="INT")
private int id;

for id field in User entiry. I believe it means generation strategy = AUTO, which is appropriate for mysql auto_increment key.

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2  
It sounds like this might be a problem with using IDENTITY for PK generation. Is that what is being used here? –  Steve Ebersole Oct 8 '12 at 22:24
1  
I agree that if the id generation is Identity then an immediate insert is required. So if possible switch to Sequence or TableGenerator. If you cannot, then the modified code is is correct but I would add null check for persist() call to avoid cascade checks. –  Hasan Ceylan Oct 9 '12 at 7:59
1  
Depends on whether you have set hibernate.id.new_generator_mappings to true (its default is false for backwards compatibility). At any rate, provided @Transactional is really doing its thing, that would be a bug in Hibernate. Traditionally IDENTITY based id generation requires an immediate INSERT be performed to know the id. However, Hibernate is supposed to try to delay the insert for the IDENTITY until flush in this case (transactional JPA usage). If you want to keep using IDENTITY for id generation, you'll have to figure out why; or enable hibernate.id.new_generator_mappings –  Steve Ebersole Oct 9 '12 at 13:13
1  
Actually, I take that back, we only delay the insert on persist for cases using extended persistence contexts. So based on your explanation that is probably not what you are doing here. So the insert should happen on persist with IDENTITY. –  Steve Ebersole Oct 9 '12 at 13:19
1  
Well this gets to a debate about wording in the JPA spec. It says that persist makes the entity "persistent" (or managed if you prefer that term). Elsewhere it describes an entity being "persistent", partially, as it having reference to its persistence identifier. In the case of IDENTITY generation the only way for us as persistence providers (JPA implementors) to know its id is to perform the insert. This illustrates, IMHO, one of a few reasons to never use IDENTITY with O/RM libraries that prefer "transactional write behind" which Hibernate and JPA are. –  Steve Ebersole Oct 9 '12 at 17:03
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2 Answers

You set your user first name to null (user.setFirstName(userForm.getFirstName());) because userForm.getFirstName() returns null, and your error displays that: Column 'first_name' cannot be null.

You should check why userForm.getFirstName() returns null or allow user's first name to be null because your current entity configuration does not allow that.

Maybe you could show us User entity?

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1  
This is completely untrue. persist makes the "persistence context" (aka, the EntityManger) aware of the entity. flush is the process of syncing the in memory state to the database. –  Steve Ebersole Oct 8 '12 at 22:17
    
Yes my bad. And that is not a problem in this case. I removed incorrect part. –  Minutis Oct 9 '12 at 3:55
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Thats correct behaviour. At the time of your first call persist(), user's firstName is null. Enventhough you have set the first name after this point, but before the flush, JPA/Hibernate prepared commands would be something like,

At the time of persist, the state of user object lets say, user@version1 Insert into user values (id, creationdate, null, null..) from user@version1 object

Now a new user version exists user@version2

At the time of flush,

check for any pending inserts/updates.. bring all the objects to version1, which is at the time of last persist.

Note that, flush may or may not do physical insert operation in DB, but the objects are are brought to the correct state, meaning non persisted changes would be lost.

Dont worry if it was working fine before may be with hibernate 3, and started not working when you migrated to hibernate 4. I have several issues, where hibernate 3 is no problem, but doesnt work on hibernate 4 without additional fixes.

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