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class example{ 
    private int x=1;
    public int xreturned(){
    return x;
   }
}
class example2<N>{
    example2<N> variable;
    public int fun(){
        int x=variable.xreturned(); 
    }
}
class mainclass{
    public static void main(String[] args){
       example2<example>obj=new example2<example>();
       if(1.equals(obj.fun()))
       System.out.println("correct");
       return 0;
   }
}

at the example2 class in fun function variable cannot find the xreturned() function of class example, how can i make it find it?. Now you may ask me how should it find it? im thinking for being possible to find it as obj has the example (type of example class) generic.. so please tell me how to make it find it with the minimum changes

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2  
how about some naming conventions? class names for example should start with a capital letter if you want to follow the convention... –  Eran Medan Oct 8 '12 at 20:19
    
...and rarely do classes contain an instance of themselves, as example2 does here, which also doesn't initialize its variable member variable. –  Jason S Oct 8 '12 at 21:13
    
this doesn't compile by the way for other reasons, return 0 from main (it's void) and 1.equals for example. also indentation of the System.out.println to make it clear it's part of the if –  Eran Medan Oct 8 '12 at 21:26

2 Answers 2

At runtime there is no way to determine what class was supplied due to type erasure. In your case it looks like N will always be of the type Example, so your class definition could be

class Example2<N extends Example> 

This would make your example work, but I suspect it is probably over simplified to highlight a point (or homework).

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2  
In addition, the type of the field in the Example2 class should be N and not Example2<N> –  Anna Oct 8 '12 at 20:32
    
you are right about type erasure, but no it will not make the example work. –  Eran Medan Oct 8 '12 at 21:14

In addition to David's answer, and the comment by Anna, here is the complete code (tested)

Note some other changes that I had to do to make it compile (see comments with explanation)

class Example{ 
    private int x=1;
    public int xreturned(){
    return x;
   }
}
class Example2<N extends Example> { //as in David's answer
    N variable; //as in Anna's comment
    public int fun(){
        int x=variable.xreturned(); 
        return x;
    }
}
class Mainclass{
    public static void main(String[] args){
       Example2<Example>obj=new Example2<Example>();
       if(1 == obj.fun()) // 1 doesn't have an equals method
           System.out.println("correct"); //indentation added, it's a condition

       //return 0; <-- you can't return 0 from main, it's return type is void
   }
}
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You would also need to supply an instance of Example, otherwise you would get a NPE. –  David Hutchison Oct 8 '12 at 22:42
    
@DavidHutchison you are absolutely right, didn't even go there, just wanted to get it to compile at least –  Eran Medan Oct 8 '12 at 23:45

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