Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my code a user enters in a specified temperature range with this method (The default range is 0 - 100):

public class range {   
     public void rangeset ()
      {
        int range1 = 0;
        int range2 = 100;

        System.out.println("Please note that the default temp range is 0-100");
        System.out.println("What is the starting temperature range?");
        range1 = sc.nextInt();
        System.out.println("What is the ending temperature range?");
        range2 = sc.nextInt();
        System.out.println("Your temperature range is " + range1 + " - " + range2);  

      HW_5.mainMenureturn();

    }//end rangeset method (instance method)

}//range class

Further down, I have an input that asks the user for a number that they want to convert to Fahrenheit.

public class HW_5 {
   public static double fahrenheit2Centigrade  ()
    {
        double result;
        BigDecimal quotient = new BigDecimal("1.8");


        //take in input, take input as BigDecimal
        System.out.println("Please enter the fahrenheit temperature you wish to convert to celsius");   
        BigDecimal fah = sc.nextBigDecimal();

     }
}

So, what I want to do is make sure that the number they entered (which is a BigDecimal) falls within the ranges specified in the other method.

1) How do I get my rangeset method to return the beginning number of the range and the ending number of the range since you can't return two values?

2) How do I then use those returned values to check if the BigDecimal in the fahrenheit2centigrade method falls within those values?

Please ask for clarification. Thanks.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

This is an issue of scope. Currently you are declaring your two range variables inside the rangeset() method, which means that they are only visible within the "scope" of the method (aka only that method has access to those variables).

What you should consider doing is instead have those variables be visible to the entire class.

public class range {   
     private int lowerBound;
     private int upperBound;

     public void rangeset ()
      {
        int lowerBound = 0;
        int upperBound = 100;

        System.out.println("Please note that the default temp range is 0-100");
        System.out.println("What is the starting temperature range?");
        lowerBound = sc.nextInt();
        System.out.println("What is the ending temperature range?");
        upperBound = sc.nextInt();
        System.out.println("Your temperature range is " + range1 + " - " + range2);  

         HW_5.mainMenureturn();

       }//end rangeset method (instance method)

    public int getLowerBound()
    {
        return lowerBound;
    }

    public int getUpperBound()
    {
        return upperBound;
    }

}//range class

Once you have things set up in this way, you can create a new range class in your main class, call the relevant methods on it, and use your getter methods to extract the data that you care about. Something like:

public class HW_5 {
   public static double fahrenheit2Centigrade  ()
    {
        double result;
        BigDecimal quotient = new BigDecimal("1.8");
        range myRange = new range();
        myRange.rangeset();
        System.out.printf("%d - %d", myRange.getLowerBound(), myRange.getUpperBound());


        //take in input, take input as BigDecimal
        System.out.println("Please enter the fahrenheit temperature you wish to convert to celsius");   
        BigDecimal fah = sc.nextBigDecimal();

     }
}

Ps. Generally you should use capital letters to start your class names, ie. Range instead of range.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is by calling the rangeset method from within fahrenheit2Centrigrade, you're forcing the user to define the range right within the calculation. I want to just be able to use what they entered in to compare it to the BigDecimal. The problem is that those variables Upper and lowerbound are local. –  Brian Oct 10 '12 at 21:25
    
They are not local in my answer. You can create the range and call rangeset anywhere you like. If you create the range in a class-wide scope, then all class methods will have access to it. –  Jordan Kaye Oct 10 '12 at 21:31
    
Why is it when I create the object from the Range class in the static method fahrenheit2Centrigrade, I get the can't reference it from non-static error but when I create an object from the HW_5 class in a static method, it's fine? –  Brian Oct 10 '12 at 21:52
    
It's all about scope. This should give you some idea: java.about.com/od/s/g/Scope.htm –  Jordan Kaye Oct 10 '12 at 21:56
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.