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My program keeps timing out. so I need to change the default connection timeout value. I found this myDb.Database.Connection.ConnectionTimeout but it's read-only.

How can I set the database timeout in Entity Framework 5?

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FYI, On EF6, Database.CommandTimeout is no longer read-only –  itsho Jun 25 at 21:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Try this on your context:

public class MyDatabase : DbContext
{
    public MyDatabase ()
        : base(ContextHelper.CreateConnection("Connection string"), true)
    {
        ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext.CommandTimeout = 180;
    }
}

If you want to define the timeout in the connection string, use the Connection Timeout parameter like in the following connection string:

<connectionStrings>

<add name="AdventureWorksEntities"
connectionString="metadata=.\AdventureWorks.csdl|.\AdventureWorks.ssdl|.\AdventureWorks.msl;
provider=System.Data.SqlClient;provider connection string='Data Source=localhost;
Initial Catalog=AdventureWorks;Integrated Security=True;Connection Timeout=60;
multipleactiveresultsets=true'" providerName="System.Data.EntityClient" />

</connectionStrings>

Source: How to: Define the Connection String

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Is it possible to set timeout via connect string? tried it but didn't work. maybe im doing it wrong –  James Oct 10 '12 at 11:57
    
Updated the answer to show how to use the Connection Timeout in the connection string. –  Leniel Macaferi Oct 12 '12 at 14:57
    
thanks for the update –  James Oct 15 '12 at 16:38
1  
I would recommend using the connection string version as if you try to access the ObjectContext in this constructor sometimes the PowerShell/NuGet console commands will fail in a circular way. –  Kevin Gorski Mar 5 '13 at 18:24
14  
Connection Timeout and CommandTimeout and two separate things. The connection string setting, Connection Timeout, won't affect the amount of time the command runs (CommandTimeout). –  Clay Lenhart Jul 25 '13 at 11:01

I extended Ronnie's answer with a fluent implementation so you can use it like so:

dm.Context.SetCommandTimeout(120).Database.SqlQuery...

public static class EF
{
    public static DbContext SetCommandTimeout(this DbContext db, TimeSpan? timeout)
    {
        ((IObjectContextAdapter)db).ObjectContext.CommandTimeout = timeout.HasValue ? (int?) timeout.Value.TotalSeconds : null;

        return db;
    }

    public static DbContext SetCommandTimeout(this DbContext db, int seconds)
    {
        return db.SetCommandTimeout(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(seconds));
    } 
}
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2  
this should be built-in to the framework –  James Aug 15 '13 at 23:42

Same as other answers, but as an extension method:

static class Extensions
{
    public static void SetCommandTimeout(this IObjectContextAdapter db, TimeSpan? timeout)
    {
        db.ObjectContext.CommandTimeout = timeout.HasValue ? (int?) timeout.Value.TotalSeconds : null;
    }
}
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My partial context looks like:

public partial class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public MyContext (string ConnectionString)
        : base(ConnectionString)
    {
        this.SetCommandTimeOut(300);
    }

    public void SetCommandTimeOut(int Timeout)
    {
        var objectContext = (this as IObjectContextAdapter).ObjectContext;
        objectContext.CommandTimeout = Timeout;
    }
}

I left SetCommandTimeOut public so only the routines I need to take a long time (more than 5 minutes) I modify instead of a global timeout.

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This question is asked for EF5, but for Entity Framework 6, you can use DbContext.Database.CommandTimeout = 180;

It's pretty simple and no cast required.

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In the generated constructor code it should call OnContextCreated()

I added this partial class to solve the problem:

partial class MyContext: ObjectContext
{
    partial void OnContextCreated()
    {
        this.CommandTimeout = 300;
    }
}
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