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I was looking for a Java timer sample and found the code below at http://www.javaprogrammingforums.com/java-se-api-tutorials/883-how-use-timer-java.html

But if you run the sample, although it does print Timer stops now... it does not return to the command prompt. This is at least what is happening on my Windows XP machine using cmd.exe.

Why does it not return control to the prompt in this case?

import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;

public class TimerSample {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        //1- Taking an instance of Timer class.
        Timer timer = new Timer("Printer");

        //2- Taking an instance of class contains your repeated method.
        MyTask t = new MyTask();


        //TimerTask is a class implements Runnable interface so
        //You have to override run method with your certain code black

        //Second Parameter is the specified the Starting Time for your timer in
        //MilliSeconds or Date

        //Third Parameter is the specified the Period between consecutive
        //calling for the method.

    timer.schedule(t, 0, 2000);

    }
}

class MyTask extends TimerTask {
    //times member represent calling times.
    private int times = 0;


    public void run() {
        times++;
        if (times <= 5) {
            System.out.println("I'm alive...");
        } else {
            System.out.println("Timer stops now...");

            //Stop Timer.
            this.cancel();
        }
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

It does not return to your command prompt because it is not expected to do so. Timer creates single non-deamon thread to run all tasks. It does not terminate the thread unless you ask it. When you execture task.cancel() method you just cancel the current task, not the whole timer which is still alive and is ready to do something else.

To terminate timer you should call its stop() method, i.e. timer.stop();

share|improve this answer
    
Well answered. +1 –  TheLima Oct 8 '12 at 20:51
    
timer.stop() ? TimerTask nor Timer has such a function? Do you mean stop the thread? But how do I do that? and there is a note in API saying stop() on thread is unsafe. –  arcomber Oct 8 '12 at 21:00
    
It's Timer.cancel(), not Timer.stop(). –  GriffeyDog Oct 8 '12 at 21:03
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In a real program you would keep a copy of the timer object and when eg program is to be closed down do a timer.cancel().

For this simple example, I added the code below after timer.schedule(t, 0, 2000);

try {
   Thread.sleep(20000);
    } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
    System.out.println("caught " + ex.getMessage());
    }

    timer.cancel();

    }
share|improve this answer

You need to explicitly terminate the Timer using timer.cancel(), e.g.:

class MyTask extends TimerTask {
 private int times = 0;
 private Timer timer;


 public MyTask(Timer timer) {
    this.timer = timer;
 }

 public void run() {
    times++;
    if (times <= 5) {
        System.out.println("I'm alive...");
    } else {
        System.out.println("Timer stops now...");

        //Stop Timer.
        this.cancel();
        this.timer.cancel();
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Did you try compiling? It doesn't. –  arcomber Oct 8 '12 at 21:11

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