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I know this question is to some degree a matter of taste. I admit this is not something I don't understand, it's just something I want to hear others' opinion about.

I need to write a method that takes two arguments, a boolean and a string. The boolean is in a sense (which will be obvious shortly) redundant, but it is part of a specification that the method must take in both arguments, and must raise an exception with a specific message text if the boolean has the "wrong" value. The bool must be true if and only if the string is not null or empty.

So here are some different styles to write (hopefully!) the same thing. Which one do you find is the most readable, and compliant with good coding practice?

// option A: Use two if, repeat throw statement and duplication of message string
public void SomeMethod(bool useName, string name)
{
  if (useName && string.IsNullOrEmpty(name))
    throw new SomeException("...");
  if (!useName && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(name))
    throw new SomeException("...");

  // rest of method
}


// option B: Long expression but using only && and ||
public void SomeMethod(bool useName, string name)
{
  if (useName && string.IsNullOrEmpty(name) || !useName && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(name))
    throw new SomeException("...");

  // rest of method
}


// option C: With == operator between booleans
public void SomeMethod(bool useName, string name)
{
  if (useName == string.IsNullOrEmpty(name))
    throw new SomeException("...");

  // rest of method
}


// option D1: With XOR operator
public void SomeMethod(bool useName, string name)
{
  if (!(useName ^ string.IsNullOrEmpty(name)))
    throw new SomeException("...");

  // rest of method
}


// option D2: With XOR operator
public void SomeMethod(bool useName, string name)
{
  if (useName ^ !string.IsNullOrEmpty(name))
    throw new SomeException("...");

  // rest of method
}

Of course you're welcome to suggest other possibilities too. Message text "..." would be something like "If 'useName' is true a name must be given, and if 'useName' is false no name is allowed".

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closed as not constructive by Erik Funkenbusch, cadrell0, Daniel A. White, Hristo Iliev, BNL Oct 16 '12 at 13:27

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Why are you including the boolean expression? If the method needs to know if the string is null or empty it can check it itself, it doesn't need to force the caller to do the check, or take the risk that the caller (intentionally or unintentionally) passed in the wrong boolean value. –  Servy Oct 8 '12 at 20:47
    
If you reverse your statement the boolean logic becomes quite obvious. --> Condition 1. string is null or empty AND Condition 2. bool is true. THEN throw someException ELSE resume method operation. –  Abhijeet Oct 8 '12 at 21:36
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2 Answers

If the method needs to know if the string is null or empty it can check it itself, it doesn't need to force the caller to do the check, or take the risk that the caller (intentionally or unintentionally) passed in the wrong boolean value. There is no need to pass such a boolean in the first place, and therefore no need to check it since you know you won't do it wrong.

Having said that, I don't know why anyone wouldn't choose option C, if they needed to compare two boolean expressions. A and B are just redundant. It's adding code for the sake of adding code. It's like throwing no-ops in there. D is just unnecessarily esoteric. Why rely on the fact that an exclusive or happens to be the exact opposite (i.e. bitwise NOT) of what you want (which is equality) when there is an operator that does exactly what you want (operator ==).

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Although these tricks can be used in some circumstances to improve readability, in this case I'd say that C, D, E are poor options - they're taking two different expected scenarios and rolling them together into a single condition, which can obscure your intent/confuse the reader. This makes the code harder to maintain and debug (you have to think a bit to understand what is going on, which increases the risk that you'll make a mistake).

(I'd go further with D and E and say they are also bad because they are applying binary arithmetic to boolean values, which means you are relying on an implicit conversion from bool (true/false) to some integer value that can be safely XORed and then implicitly converted back into a boolean. I prefer to avoid implicit conversions and am careful to treat bools as bools)

A, B are better options because they simply and explicitly spell out what they mean for each of the expected scenarios in turn. It's far less likely that someone maintaining your code in future will become confused about the expeceted behaviour of the code under different conditions.

However, here are a couple of other options that might make the code easier to read:

bool nameIsValid = (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(name));
if (useName)
{
  if (!nameIsValid) 
    throw new SomeException("..."); 
}
else if (nameIsValid) 
{
  throw new SomeException("..."); 
}

(Using else saves the reader having to re-evaluate the "useName" condition, which can speed up reading time)

or, in a more compact way:

bool nameIsValid = (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(name));
if ((useName && !nameIsValid) || (!useName && nameIsValid))
    throw new SomeException("..."); 

(Using a temporary variable you can compress/reduce the code and make it much more readable while still explitly specifying the two separate scenarios you wish to cover)

or even:

bool nameIsValid = (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(name));

// If we are using a name it MUST be valid
if (useName && !nameIsValid)
    throw new SomeException("..."); 

// If we are NOT using a name, it is illegal to supply one
if (!useName && nameIsValid)
    throw new SomeException("..."); 

Comments can be used to clarify what the checks are for and will allow people reading your code to work out what the code soes without having to think about what the conditional expression means. (What I mean is that it is easy to see what it does, but the condition !usename && nameIsValid does not explain why we would want to check this.

This last example is my personal preference - because I have stated what I intended to happen and why I intended it as well as actually writing the code to do it. This allows any programmer reading the code to easily check that I said what I meant. It gives you a simple cross-check. (Some would claim that the risk of this is that someone can modify the code without updating the comment, which makes the comment misleading - but if a quick skim read shows you that the code and comment don't seem to match each other, then you know that something is wrong, and that it is worth investing time in that code to fix it. If they match, the quick cross-check is successful and you can be much more confident that the code is probably as intended (so you only have to think about whether the design is right, not the implementation)).

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