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I have this sample code

public class MyClass
{
    private static int tempKey = 0;

    public MyClass()
    {
        this.Key = --tempKey;
    }
    public int Key {get; set;}
}

What does --tempkey do exactly?

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6  
I had the same issue when trying to figure out what the ++ meant in C++. The correct google query is c# arithmetic operators :) –  Alban Oct 8 '12 at 20:57
7  
I find the 9 downvotes harsh. The question has been correctly asked. –  Alexandre C. Oct 8 '12 at 21:42
1  
I didn't find the answer in google thats why I asked here. But what I really need the comparision in VB and "What exactly/actually does" –  Will Oct 8 '12 at 22:21
1  
++ and -- are standard C pre/post increment/decrement operators. One should have a basic understanding of C before venturing into C#, or should at least read a C# primer that would discuss these. –  Hot Licks Oct 9 '12 at 11:49
1  
what I want is to use it in VB but as you say I don't know the basics of C –  Will Oct 9 '12 at 17:51

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It decrements tempKey and returns new value. Compare with tempKey--, which also decrements tempKey, but returns the original value.

See Microsoft documentation here.

The increment operator (++) increments its operand by 1. The increment operator can appear before or after its operand:

++ var 
var ++ 

Where:

var An expression that denotes a storage location or a property or an indexer.

The first form is a prefix increment operation. The result of the operation is the value of the operand after it has been incremented.

The second form is a postfix increment operation. The result of the operation is the value of the operand before it has been incremented.

EDIT: This is valid for C#. Visual Basic doesn't have this increment/decrement operator.

In Visual Basic --tempKey is evaluated as -1 * (-1 * tempKey) which is equal to tempKey.

enter image description here

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"--x" is pre-decrement arithmetic operator. Meaning the value is decremented by 1 before being used in the statement.

int x = 10;
Console.WriteLine(--x); // This will print 9

"x--" is post-decrement arithmetic operator. Meaning the value is used and then decremented by 1.

int x = 10;
Console.WriteLine(x--); // This will print 10
Console.WriteLine(x):   // This will print 9
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It decrements the variable by 1 and then evaluates to the decremented value. Therefore, in the example you gave, the constructor would decrement tempKey from 0 to -1 and then set Key to the same value of -1 as well. For instance:

int x = 5;
int y = --x;  // x gets set to 4 and they y is also set to 4

int x2 = 5;
int y2 = x2--;  // x2 gets set to 4 and then y gets set to 5 (x2's value prior to decrement)

There is no equivalent operator in VB. In VB, --tempKey would have no affect. A single minus sign before a variable name will negate the value. Two minus signs in a row before a variable name will negate the value twice, thereby returning it to the original value. For instance:

Dim x As Integer = 5
Dim y As Integer = --x  ' x still equals 5 and y also gets assigned 5

In other words, it's the same as saying y = -1 * -1 * x.

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It subtracts one from the value of tempkey.

More info can be found here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6a71f45d.aspx

Specifically, from http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/wc3z3k8c.aspx

The decrement operator (--) decrements its operand by 1. The decrement operator can appear before or after its operand: --variable and variable--. The first form is a prefix decrement operation. The result of the operation is the value of the operand "after" it has been decremented. The second form is a postfix decrement operation. The result of the operation is the value of the operand "before" it has been decremented.

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The -- operator is the subtraction operator. In this case, it subtracts one from the tempKey variable. Because it is before the variable, it subtracts the value first, before returning it into the this.Key value. If it was after the variable tempkey-- then it would subtract the value after returning the value into this.Key.

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--i decrements the number and returns the decremented result, whereas i-- also decrements the number, but returns the pre-decremented result.

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It is a pre-decrement operator. Effectively, it subtracts one from tempKey. Thus when the constructor MyClass is first called, tempKey changes its value to -1 and then this.Key gets the value -1. Since tempKey is static, each subsequent call for constructor will decrement tempKey.

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