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I need some help with web programming. I have to do this assignment from school and the prof has given details on the structuring. One of them is that my site should be XHTML compliant (Strict or Transitional). Another is that I need to use at least one HTML5 feature. How do I use an HTML5 feature if none of the new tags will validate with XHTML?

I am declaring it as XHTML 1.0 Transitional.

Here is my HTML code where I am having trouble.

<body id="index" class="home">
<header id="banner" class="body">
<h1><a href="#">Header1 </a></h1>

<nav><ul>
<li class="active"><a href="#">home</a></li>
<li><a href="#">portfolio</a></li>
<li><a href="#">blog</a></li>
<li><a href="#">contact</a></li>
</ul></nav>

</header>
</body>

In the line with header and nav, it says the elements are undefined and that there are no attributes id and class in header. Please help.

Thanks.

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Your professor is asking something that does't make any sense. –  DA. Oct 8 '12 at 21:16

2 Answers 2

The interpretation of the assignment that seems to make most sense is that you are required to use XHTML linearization of HTML5, also known as XHTML5. This simply means that you use HTML5 like anyone else but do that using general XML principles.

In the example case, this would mean the following markup:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title></title>
</head>
<body id="index" class="home">
<header id="banner" class="body">
<h1><a href="#">Header1 </a></h1>

<nav><ul>
<li class="active"><a href="#">home</a></li>
<li><a href="#">portfolio</a></li>
<li><a href="#">blog</a></li>
<li><a href="#">contact</a></li>
</ul></nav>

</header>
</body>
</html>

The XHTML 1.0 doctypes are something quite different. They define fixed versions of HTML, so you cannot use, in the static markup, anything not allowed by those versions, i.e. anything that is new in HTML5 as compared with XHTML 1.0 and HTML 4.01 (which is what “HTML5 feature” probably means in the assignment). The requirement “XHTML compliant (Strict or Transitional)” is obscure, but if it is meant to refer to XHTML 1.0 specifically, then the assignment is self-contradictory (unless you are supposed to use client-side scripting to get to “HTML5 features”).

(This answer was largely rewritten thanks to @Alohci’s comments.)

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That snippet won't validate as XHTML5. For one thing, the word "doctype" must be in upper case. For another, the markup doesn't meet the HTML5 content model requirements. –  Alohci Oct 8 '12 at 23:34
    
@Alohci, did you test that on the validators? I did. It is true that for XML well-formedness, doctype must be in upper case and the entire document must be wrapped in a single element, with <html> and </html> (or with <foo> and </foo>), but that’s a different issue. HTML5 does not impose such requirements. It has no content model requirements in the XML sense – there is no HTML5 DTD. –  Jukka K. Korpela Oct 9 '12 at 3:57
    
Jukka, yes I did. The content model requirements come from chapter 4 of the W3C HTML5 spec, which like almost everything except chapters 8 and 9 (or chapters 12 and 13 in the Living Unstandard) apply equally to the HTML and XHTML serializations. The absence of a DTD is irrelevant. –  Alohci Oct 9 '12 at 6:27
    
@Alohci, check out this validation link: validator.nu/… which gives a “validates” response. You may have tried validating a document served as application/xhtml+xml. Then you need to follow XML rules, and you also need to do that if you actually process the document with software that expect it to be XML. –  Jukka K. Korpela Oct 9 '12 at 6:47
    
Jukka, I don't get your point. The document at that link is XML well formed and meets the content model for (X)HTML5. (In fact, it's valid polyglot.) It's nothing like the example in your answer. –  Alohci Oct 9 '12 at 7:03

Depending on your assignment's definition of "HTML5", this is impossible with markup alone. A document cannot use a new HTML5 element while remaining compliant with any of the XHTML 1.0 doctypes.

However if you're allowed to use JavaScript APIs that were introduced with HTML5, such as localStorage, you may be able to get away with writing a script to access those APIs while not using any new HTML5 elements like <header> or <nav>. Those APIs are not tied to HTML5 markup and so can be used with any flavor of markup, but are generally called "HTML5 features" anyway.

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Thanks. That's what I was thinking but I wasn't too sure. Guess I'll ask the prof for clarification. –  J H Oct 8 '12 at 21:04
    
You could also create new elements dynamically, e.g. document.createElement('nav') etc. –  Jukka K. Korpela Oct 9 '12 at 7:14
    
@Jukka: Good point. I keep forgetting that you can trivially work around validation issues with DOM scripting — insofar as is allowed by technical implementation constraints at least. –  BoltClock Oct 9 '12 at 7:19

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