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So I have a relatively complicated MySQL query that is giving a Duplicate Column, for reasons I haven't been able to determine. I'm somewhat new to SQL.

The query is supposed to join a list of "problem" entries with the database of "tickets," specifically the latest ticket for the particular id. Thus I have an inner query that executes a JOIN of the ticket table on itself to get the latest ticket. This works correctly. I then attempt to JOIN this inner selection with the problem database, however, I get a Duplicate Column Name id, despite the fact that this is the column name I am joining on. My understanding is that when you join on a particular column, it shouldn't "count" as duplicate...

Anyway, the query:

SELECT * FROM `problem` P
LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT * FROM (
        SELECT id, MAX(ticket_id) AS ticket_id
        FROM `ticket`
        WHERE ticket_status = 'o'
        GROUP BY id
    ) AS MAX
    INNER JOIN (
        SELECT id, ticket_id, other_data, time_stamp FROM `ticket`
    ) CUR ON MAX.id = CUR.id AND MAX.ticket_id = CUR.ticket_id
) T ON P.id=T.id
WHERE
        P.since IS NOT NULL;

As I said, if I do just this:

SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT id, MAX(ticket_id) AS ticket_id
    FROM `ticket`
    WHERE ticket_status = 'o'
    GROUP BY id
) AS MAX
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT id, ticket_id, other_data, time_stamp FROM `ticket`
) CUR ON MAX.id = CUR.id AND MAX.ticket_id = CUR.ticket_id

I get a table of the latest ticket for each id.

One thing I have tried to fix this is to SELECT MAX.* FROM ( instead of just SELECT * FROM (. This eliminates the duplicate column name error, but the inner query no longer returns any other_data or time_stamp – I only get the id and ticket_id columns. This defeats the purpose of the join in the first place, of course.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Alias the id column as below:

SELECT * FROM `problem` P
LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT * FROM (
        SELECT id AS max_id, MAX(ticket_id) AS ticket_id
        FROM `ticket`
        WHERE ticket_status = 'o'
        GROUP BY max_id
    ) AS MAX
    INNER JOIN (
        SELECT id AS cur_id, ticket_id, other_data, time_stamp FROM `ticket`
    ) CUR ON MAX.max_id = CUR.cur_id AND MAX.ticket_id = CUR.ticket_id
) T ON P.id=T.max_id
WHERE
        P.since IS NOT NULL;

I wrote in a comment that you could just select the needed columns to avoid the duplicate and the question author understood I meant the external select, I was talking about the inner one. Hope I wrote it right, didn't test.

SELECT * FROM `problem` P
LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT CUR.id, CUR.ticket_id, CUR.other_data, CUR.time_stamp FROM (
        SELECT id, MAX(ticket_id)
        FROM `ticket`
        WHERE ticket_status = 'o'
        GROUP BY max_id
    ) AS MAX
    INNER JOIN (
        SELECT id, ticket_id, other_data, time_stamp FROM `ticket`
    ) CUR ON MAX.max_id = CUR.cur_id AND MAX.ticket_id = CUR.ticket_id
) T ON P.id=T.id
WHERE
        P.since IS NOT NULL;
share|improve this answer
    
Due to the INNER JOIN I'm reasonably sure that both max_id and cur_id will always be perfectly equal and therefore I can check against either. Certainly seemed that way in my testing. Many thanks! –  KRyan Oct 8 '12 at 21:17
    
@KRyan That's correct, didn't really put all that much thought into it, wanted to answer fast, happened to me quite a few times recently that someone posted a bit faster. You should remove one of the conditions in that case, updated answer. You should also not SELECT * inside the join but just a minimal number of columns which you actually need, might also remove the duplicate id column and make your query a bit faster. –  xception Oct 8 '12 at 21:19
    
I'm pretty sure the SELECT * is fine because I'm selecting from a subquery that only returns the columns I'm actually interested in. I'm certainly not getting more columns than id, ticket_id, other_data, and time_stamp, even when I output the raw result. –  KRyan Oct 9 '12 at 16:12
    
I'll update the answer with what I meant. –  xception Oct 9 '12 at 16:23

Try giving all the columns in the joined query an alias using AS, like you've done for the MAX(ticket_id) field.

eg:

INNER JOIN (
    SELECT id AS cur_id, ticket_id as cur_ticket_id  ... etc
share|improve this answer
    
I believe you actually need to do so for both the inner-inner select as well as the Inner Join section, since you get an id column from each. –  KRyan Oct 8 '12 at 21:16

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