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I am trying to produce a table with a different number of cells in each row.

  • The first row is a header row (every other row contains cells). This header is the width of the table.

  • The second row has 2 cells in it...

  • the third has 1 cell...

  • the fourth has 4 cells...

  • the fifth and final row has 3 cells.

I want the table set up so that the rows span the full width of the table. If the table is 1000px...

  • The header would be 1000px wide

  • the cells in the 2nd row would be 500px EACH

  • the cell in the 3rd row would be 1000px

  • the cells in the 4th row would be 250px EACH

  • and the cells in the 5th row would be 333px, 334px, and 333px each (left-to-right)

I figured out I could use colspan for the first 4 rows, but the 5th (with 3 cells) would require a non-integer value. The cells in the 5th row won't expand beyond their column without colspan that I can tell...

  • trying the width:## CSS code

  • inside a div tag for each cell

  • inside the td tag

  • creating a class or classes that define the cell widths

  • id-ing each cell, with or without a div tag, and defining widths individually

  • and adjuting the table-layout: option

After several days, I'm now at my rope's end. The only thing I can come up with is deliberately tripling the number of cells in each row so that colspan would be all integer values. That sounds inconvenient and unreasonably difficult to format the table the way I'd like.

It's a table of Batman movies for a website -- a practice website I'm building, in order to learn HTML/CSS. I've been working on-and-off with HTML for several months, and CSS for a few weeks.

PS: It is not being used for layout, I am simply trying to adjust the layout of the table itself.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So the table using colspan is fine all except the final row?

Have you considered including a one row table with 3 cells within a colspaned cell for the final row?

<table>
    <thead>
        <tr>
           <th colspan="4">
           </th> 
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td colspan="2"></td>    
            <td colspan="2"></td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td colspan="4"></td>    
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td></td>    
            <td></td>
            <td></td>    
            <td></td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td colspan="4">
                <table>
                    <tbody>
                       <tr>
                           <td></td>
                           <td></td>
                           <td></td>
                       <tr>
                    </tbody>
                </table>
            </td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table> 

You may need to set a width for the inner table as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Definitely worth a try. Thank you! –  Batfan1939 Oct 9 '12 at 13:04

I can think of a few options:

1). Use nested divs instead of a table. The rows could be divs, all with the same width, and the cells could be divs with relative widths specified in percentage. (50%, 25%, 33%)


    <div class="row"><div class="cell100"></div></div>
    <div class="row"><div class="cell50"></div><div class="cell50"></div></div>
    ...

2). If you feel you need to use a table for some reason you can specify your table to have a number of columns matching the lowest common multiple of all of your cell counts per row. For example yours would be 1, 2, 3 and 4. The lowest common multiple is 12. A row with one cell would have a cell with colspan of 12. A row with 2 cells would have cells with colspan of 6. 3 cells would each have colspan of 4. 4 cells would each have colspan of 3.


    <table>
    <tr><td colspan="12">...</td></tr>
    <tr><td colspan="6">...</td><td colspan="6">...</td></tr>
    ...
    <tr><td colspan="3">...</td><td colspan="3">...</td><td colspan="3">...</td></tr>
    </table>

3). Or you could use a grid system like that provided with bootstrap or 960 grid system or any of the other grid systems out there.

I recommend 1 or 3 because they are reusable, however option 2 would also work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this answer, I will try this. –  Batfan1939 Oct 9 '12 at 12:57
    
Just out of curiosity, is there a way to have visible borders using divs, equivalent to style = "border:2px solid white; border-collapse:collapse;"? –  Batfan1939 Oct 9 '12 at 13:01

colspan is an integer. It allows a particular cell to expand to fill more than one column.

For example:

-------------------------
|        |          |   |
-------------------------
|                   |   |
-------------------------

The first cell in the second row has colspan="2". Use width (either HTML or CSS) to set the width in more absolute terms.

The HTML for this table would look something like this:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="2"></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</table>

Notice that the second row has only two cells because the first occupies two columns.

EDIT
So basically, you need whole numbers. You have a row with 4 cells, and a row with three cells. So each cell in the row of 4 takes up 1/4 of the horizontal space. Each cell in the row of 3 takes of 1/3 of the horizontal space. Now you need to make these fractions equivalent.

I'll save you the step of doing the math. The colspan for each cell in the row of 4 is 3, and the colspan in the row of 3 is 4. The colspan in the row of 1 is... drumroll please... 12.

<table>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="12"></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="4"></td>
        <td colspan="4"></td>
        <td colspan="4"></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="3"></td>
        <td colspan="3"></td>
        <td colspan="3"></td>
        <td colspan="3"></td>
    </tr>
</table>

produces

-------------
|           |
-------------
|   |   |   |
-------------
|  |  |  |  |
-------------
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but the final row would need a non-integer value, which is why I can't use it. I want each cell in a row tobe of an equal length. –  Batfan1939 Oct 8 '12 at 21:19
    
Please see the updated answer. –  JDB Oct 9 '12 at 2:34
    
@user1729886 - If you downvoted this answer, can you please review the edits? If this does not add any value, I will delete the post (but I'd hate to do that if it still presents some value). –  JDB Oct 9 '12 at 19:27

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