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I need to put some value to maps if it is not there yet. The key->value (if set) should always be in two collections (that is put should happen in two maps atomically). I have tried to implement this as follows:

private final ConcurrentMap<String, Object> map1 = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, Object>();
private final ConcurrentMap<String, Object> map2 = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, Object>();

public Object putIfAbsent(String key) {
    Object retval = map1.get(key);
    if (retval == null) {
        synchronized (map1) {
            retval = map1.get(key);
            if (retval == null) {
                Object value = new Object(); //or get it somewhere
                synchronized (map2) {
                    map1.put(key, value);
                    map2.put(key, new Object());
                }
                retval = value;
            }
        }
    }
    return retval;
}

public void doSomething(String key) {
    Object obj1 = map1.get(key);
    Object obj2 = map2.get(key);
    //do smth
}

Will that work fine in all cases? Thanks

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Are you having any difficulties? Have you tested? –  Nambari Oct 8 '12 at 21:34
    
In general, "have you tested?" is a good question. With concurrency, testing won't help much. Because being correct is more about guaranteeing (through proofs, though often informal ones) that something can't happen. –  John Watts Oct 8 '12 at 21:44
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A few problems:

  • Don't use "double-checked locking". A quick Google search will reveal tons of articles which explain the problems with this technique. Just check inside the synchronized block.
  • You don't need to synchronize on both map1 and map2. Just use one or the other.
  • Synchronize within doSomething. Make sure you synchronize on the same object which is used for synchronization in putIfAbsent.
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1  
Maybe better would be to use a separate lock object, maybe even a java.util.concurrent.locks.Lock. This would separate concerns better. –  msandiford Oct 8 '12 at 21:40
    
How would it "separate concerns" better? All it would do is make the code more verbose. Separate lock objects are useful when you need different semantics from synchronized (such as when you want to allow multiple concurrent readers). Otherwise you're just writing more code for no reason. –  Alex D Oct 8 '12 at 21:43
    
If you synchronise on the map, then the map (that is arbitrarily chosen) is both the lock object and a data structure. IMO, it is better to separate these concerns, particularly as this circumstance would potentially benefit greatly from using a readers/writer lock. –  msandiford Oct 8 '12 at 21:52
    
If this code is performance-sensitive, then definitely, a readers/writer lock would be best, and an explicit Lock object would then be called for. Otherwise, he would really be better off just declaring the methods as synchronized. I say keep it short and sweet... but if something else works better for you, then more power to you! –  Alex D Oct 8 '12 at 22:03
1  
@glaz666, your comment about "locking both collections" implies that you may not really understand how "locking" works. I can try to explain, but it will take more than a brief comment here. Do you want to start a private chat? –  Alex D Oct 9 '12 at 10:24
show 3 more comments

You should never use synchronized with ConcurrentHashMap (it's pretty much defeating the purpose). The best way to make atomic additions to CHH is by using the built-in replace method. For example:

do {

    oldValue1 = map1.get(key1);
    oldValue2 = map2.get(key2);
    newValue1 = // some logic to determine a new value for key1/value1
    newValue2 = // some more logic to determine a new value for key2/value2

} while (!map1.replace(key1, oldValue1, newValue1) && !map2.replace(key2, oldValue2, newValue2));

I don't know how to specifically adapt this to your example, but this should give you somewhere to start. Basically what happens is you get the key from the map, do some logic, and if the key is still the same as it was before the logic, it will replace the entry and return true, then the loop will break. Otherwise it will just repeat the loop until it can do the update atomically.

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I was originally going to suggest something like this but how do you hide the update to map2 until the update to map1 succeeds? You might assume that both updates will succeed eventually but still one will happen first and during that interval you see the inconsistency. –  John Watts Oct 8 '12 at 21:49
    
If you only put and never remove from or clear the maps you could establish a protocol. Always add to map1 last. Always read from map1 first. If map1 has no value while reading, ignore map2. –  John Watts Oct 8 '12 at 21:53
    
You can also verify both maps in the condition check before making a write –  Jordan Denison Oct 8 '12 at 21:53
    
If I understand your proposal right, no. That gives you eventual consistency, which you already had, assuming there are no other writers. The OP asked for atomicity. If I'm misunderstanding, please show in code what you mean by "verify both maps in the condition check"? –  John Watts Oct 8 '12 at 21:59
    
while (!map1.replace(key1, oldValue1, newValue1) && !map2.replace(key2, oldValue2, newValue2)) –  Jordan Denison Oct 8 '12 at 22:01
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In order to do what you want, I'd use atomic references:

class PairHolder {
   public final ConcurrentMap map1;
   public final ConcurrentMap map2;
   public PairHolder(...) // set values here.
}

private AtomicReference<PairHolder> mapHolder = ... // initialize it somehow

do {
  PairHolder holder = mapHolder.get();
  ConcurrentMap map1 = holder.map1.clone()
  ConcurrentMap map2 = holder.map2.clone()
  newMap1.putIfAbsent(...);
  newMap2.putIfAbsent(...);
} while (!mapHolder.compareAndSet(holder, new PairHolder(newMap1,newMap2))

this way you alway will be sure, that mapHolder contains the reference to PairHolder, which in turn have two maps updated 100% atomically. At least CAS should guarantee this, however on multi-processor systems it might be false.

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I feel that collections can be modified by another thread, and when mapHolder will be substituted with new one referencing to another collections, you may loose inserted items. –  glaz666 Oct 9 '12 at 9:37
    
no way, because maps are cloned BEFORE modification, so neither thread works with shared map instance. –  jdevelop Oct 9 '12 at 15:03
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Ok, I finally came to this solution:

private Map<String, Object> map1 = new HashMap<String, Object>();
private Map<String, Object> map2 = new HashMap<String, Object>();

private final ReentrantReadWriteLock rwl = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();

public void putIfAbsent(String key, Object o) {
    rwl.readLock().lock();
    try {
        if (map1.get(key) == null) {
            rwl.readLock().unlock();
            rwl.writeLock().lock();
            try {
                if (map1.get(key) == null) {
                    map1.put(key, getValue());
                    map2.put(key, getValue());
                }
            }finally {
                rwl.readLock().lock();
                rwl.writeLock().unlock();
            }
        }
    } finally {
        readLock.unlock();
    }
}

public void readMap(String key) {
   rwl.readLock().lock();
    try {
       Object obj1 = map1.get(key);
       Object obj2 = map2.get(key);
    } finally {
        rwl.readLock().unlock();
    }

}
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