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I have these options in my homework. I will explain my reason and I hope someone can critique them?

Indicate whether the following CPU instructions are the user-only or the O/S only or both?

  1. Execution of 'sleep' instruction that halts CPU execution

    user-only because I've only seen programmers writing sleep

  2. Loading the 'program counter' PC register with a new memory address

    I think it's O/S only.

  3. Reading of disk controller register

    O/S only.

  4. 'trap' that generates interrupt

    From what I understand trap is usually a user-program fault and since O/S is a software application, so probably BOTH

  5. Loading of alarm timeout value into clock register

    O/S only

  6. Reading the processor status word PSW register

    O/S only.

  7. Loading the memory lower bounds register

    O/S only

  8. Adding the contents of two memory locations

    both. O/S needs to do computation too.

I don't really understand how to make a distinction between user and O/S specific instructions. They are all essentially "user" programs..

Can someone verify these answers, tell me why I am wrong, and how to tackle these questions?

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What is your supposed skill level? Collegiate or high-school? What year is the course? Is English your native language (because reading the wording I don't think so - maybe the prof?)? Knowing some of these will help some of us target answers to help you out. –  jcolebrand Oct 8 '12 at 21:51
    
It's college and this is my sophomore course in O/S. I am a native English speaker... thanks –  user1730053 Oct 8 '12 at 21:52
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1 Answer 1

I don't really understand how to make a distinction between user and O/S specific instructions. They are all essentially "user" programs.

Here's the difference: Did you start a task to have that happen, or did it happen on its own?

Did you start a task to read from the hard drive, or did you merely instruct the OS to do so? (all device access is an OS instruction, for the most part)

Sometimes professors want you to say that "reading the hard drive is user initiated" but "preemptive multitasking by the OS is always OS initiated" or "user actions may remain in a limited state while waiting on a device to finish responding and the OS to return control in a pre-emptive multitasking OS"


These are how I interpret the answers, but if you can't find these answers in the coursework then adopting my answers won't help you any. Notice that I gave a short blurb after each to explain why I chose these things. I am not your professor and have no way to know what he/she intends, so be sure that you can understand my responses. Also, having programmed in ASM helps to answer some of these ...

  1. Execution of 'sleep' instruction that halts CPU execution

    O/S. Sleep is actually just a counter that says to skip execution for one or more cycles, and is most often modeled by an API call. This can allow the scheduler access to delay reloading the pre-empted task until many rounds later. Once again, many very basic platforms would require a NOP loop counter to even come close to emulating a sleep command.

  2. Loading the 'program counter' PC register with a new memory address

    O/S. The Program Counter register is intended to be used by the system to keep track of the current execution of a program, and during multi-process pre-emption may be used to save the current execution point of the program.

  3. Reading of disk controller register

    O/S. In general User commands do not interface the disk subsystem, although on older systems they may be accessed, often by direct register access. In more modern systems, the disk is accessed only by the O/S, and is only accessed by the User via API.

  4. 'trap' that generates interrupt

    User, O/S. This is when we generate a request for the O/S to handle a situation for us, so we give up control to the internal kernel. It can also result in something returning a faulted condition.

  5. Loading of alarm timeout value into clock register

    O/S. These timers are often regarded as having system-only level access, as they are used to monitor the rest of the system. Will be generally protected in CPUs that support such protection (such as those that support ring-level execution prevention).

  6. Reading the processor status word PSW register

    User, O/S. Notably the PSW registers are system-level controlled ONLY. On rare occasion one may find a system which allows one, two or merely some of the PSW registers to be read by a user. Since these are status fields for program execution, they aren't normally required to be user readable.

  7. Loading the memory lower bounds register

    User, O/S. All memory register assignment is done through CPU commands which are directly received from the binary executable loaded into the CPUs registers. There are no restrictions (aside from changing execution ring level, in participating processors) which are particularly prevented from happening at the application level. Some device interaction may or may not be permitted, and often registers are how devices are interacted with on older hardware. Note that the base memory address may not be 0, and the O/S may intercept memory calls specifically to sandbox the application.

  8. Adding the contents of two memory locations

    User, O/S. This is a fundamental requirement of algorithm design, and is often one of the first and most basic commands designed into a CPU unit.

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Thank you. But some of them are confusing. For example, #8 is to add the contents of two memory addresses. This can be initiated either by a user-code or the O/S. #1 is also kind of hard to tell because I don't know if O/S can actually generate an instruction calls sleep(). I know O/S has a scheduler to put a task to sleep, however. –  user1730053 Oct 8 '12 at 22:03
    
You've just answered it. The O/S has a scheduler to put a task to sleep, so it's User, O/S, because it actually runs to the O/S for the command, not to the CPU (per-se). Which means I'm wrong, yeah? –  jcolebrand Oct 9 '12 at 14:28
    
#8 you've answered repeatedly for yourself. The user code still goes to the CPU as bytecode, it's still interpreted, there's just wrangling around memory access. Addition/multiplication are still bytecode the app is fully capable of asking the CPU to do without involving anyone else. –  jcolebrand Oct 9 '12 at 14:29
    
#2 is surely "both"? The jump instruction sets the program counter and is used by any real program. –  Viktor Dahl Oct 10 '12 at 10:52
    
idk, never said I was perfect, and would have to say "refer to the lecture materials" because it can be argued that loading the counter is only done when an app is created/empted in, as opposed to updating the counter. idk. –  jcolebrand Oct 10 '12 at 14:15
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