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I been working in a project for my Data Networks course and I encounter a memory leak but I don't understand why it's happening.

By the way, I know there is a awful mix of C and C++, but I can't do anything about it, it's based on class code and I can't modified that, I know that this is not a good way to do it and I need to use char* as requisite.

My program it's multithreaded and I handle this struct:

typedef struct packetQueue
{
    char* buf;
    int length;

    packetQueue()
    {
        buf = nullptr;
        length = 0;
    }

    packetQueue(char* buffer, int len)
    {
        length = len;
        buf = new char[length + 1];
        memcpy(buf, buffer, len);
        buf[length] = '\0';
    }

    packetQueue(const packetQueue& other)
    {
        length = other.length;

        if (other.buf)
        {
            buf = new char[length + 1];
            memcpy(buf, other.buf, length);
            buf[length] = '\0';
        }
        else
        {
            buf = nullptr;
        }
    }

    packetQueue& operator=(const packetQueue& that)
    {
        if (this == &that)
        {
            return *this;
        }

        delete[] buf;

        length = that.length;

        if (that.buf)
        {
            buf = new char[length + 1];
            memcpy(buf, that.buf, length);
            buf[length] = '\0';
        }
        else
        {
            buf = nullptr;
        }
        return *this;
    }

    ~packetQueue()
    {
        delete[] buf;
        buf = nullptr;
    }

} PACKET;

In my constructor with two parameters I do that assignment because the push of my queue does a deep copy of my struct and like I have my copy constructor and I already handled that. So, I have one thread (I been testing one by one, and the VLD results are just for this one).

DWORD _stdcall PHY_in_Thread(void* data)
{
    int numbytes, counter = 0;

    SOCKET hostSocket = *(SOCKET*) data; // Socket where the host receives

    struct sockaddr_in si_recvfrom;
    struct sockaddr_storage their_addr;
    socklen_t addr_len;

    addr_len = sizeof their_addr;

    while ( 1 )
{
    char* recBuf = new char[BUFLEN + 1];
    // Checks if it's any buffer on the socket to be processed
    if ( (numbytes = recvfrom(hostSocket, recBuf, BUFLEN, 0, (sockaddr*) &si_recvfrom, &addr_len)) == -1)
    {
        cerr << "Could not receive datagram." << endl;
        delete[] recBuf;
        closesocket(hostSocket);            
        WSACleanup();
        exit(0);
    }
    recBuf[numbytes] = '\0'; // append NULL to the end of the string

    char* temporalBuffer = new char[numbytes - CHECKSUM_MAX_SIZE + 1];
    memcpy(temporalBuffer, recBuf, numbytes - CHECKSUM_MAX_SIZE);
    temporalBuffer[numbytes - CHECKSUM_MAX_SIZE] = '\0';

    char extractedChecksum[CHECKSUM_HEX_SIZE + 1];
    DWORD crcBuffer = crc32buf(temporalBuffer, numbytes- CHECKSUM_MAX_SIZE); // Calculates the CRC32 checksum
    _snprintf(extractedChecksum, 8 , "%08lX", crcBuffer); // Prints the string in a buffer
    extractedChecksum[CHECKSUM_HEX_SIZE] = '\0';

    delete[] temporalBuffer;

    string strExtractedChecksum = extractedChecksum; // Copies the array in a string
    transform(strExtractedChecksum.begin(), strExtractedChecksum.end(), strExtractedChecksum.begin(), upper); // Uppercase the string

    // Array for store the checksum of the packet
    char readChecksum[CHECKSUM_MAX_SIZE + 1];

    // Store the checksum of the packet in local variable
    memcpy( readChecksum, &recBuf[numbytes - CHECKSUM_MAX_SIZE], CHECKSUM_MAX_SIZE);    
    readChecksum[CHECKSUM_MAX_SIZE] = '\0';

    std::stringstream stream;
    string strReadChecksum;
    for (int i = 0; i < CHECKSUM_MAX_SIZE; i++ )
    {
        int number = static_cast<int>(readChecksum[i]); // Casts every character of the checksum array

        if ( readChecksum[i] <= -1 ) // In case the int value it's negative adds the constant value to make that recognizable
        {
            number += 256;
        }

        // Convert the decimal number in a hex representation
        stream.str("");
        stream << hex << number;

        if ( stream.str().length() < 2 ) // In case it's a number less than 10, adds a 0 at the beginning
        {
            strReadChecksum += "0" +  stream.str();
        }
        else
        {
            // Working out the presentation of the number
            strReadChecksum += stream.str();
        }
    }

    std::transform(strReadChecksum.begin(), strReadChecksum.end(), strReadChecksum.begin(), upper); // Uppercase the string
    strReadChecksum[CHECKSUM_HEX_SIZE] = '\0';

    cout << "[PI] Frame #" << counter <<" received ("<< numbytes <<" bytes). " << endl;
    if ( !strcmp(strReadChecksum.c_str(), extractedChecksum) ) // Checks if the CRC are equal
    {
        cout << "[CRC] Checksum OK: 0x" << extractedChecksum << endl;
    }
    else
    {
        cout << "[CRC] Checksum failure: 0x" << extractedChecksum << endl;
    }

    // Push the packet in the MAC_in_queue to be processed
    MAC_in_queue.push(PACKET(recBuf, numbytes));
    recBuf = nullptr;
    counter++;

            break;   // Just for test one packet
}

MAC_in_queue.clear();

return 0;

}

But when I execute this thread and send something to this thread to be stored in this queue gives a leak. In this execution there is only one item to make things simple.

---------- Block 29 at 0x0068F718: 264 bytes ----------
  Call Stack:
    d:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\concurrent_queue.h (402): Host.exe!Concurrency::concurrent_queue<packetQueue,std::allocator<packetQueue> >::_Allocate_page + 0xF bytes
    f:\dd\vctools\crt_bld\self_x86\crt\src\concurrent_queue.cpp (113): MSVCP110D.dll!Concurrency::details::_Micro_queue::_Push + 0xD bytes
    f:\dd\vctools\crt_bld\self_x86\crt\src\concurrent_queue.cpp (240): MSVCP110D.dll!Concurrency::details::_Concurrent_queue_base_v4::_Internal_move_push
    d:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\concurrent_queue.h (581): Host.exe!Concurrency::concurrent_queue<packetQueue,std::allocator<packetQueue> >::push + 0xF bytes
    d:\users\silex rpr\documents\visual studio 2012\projects\project3\hoster\host.cpp (638): Host.exe!PHY_in_Thread + 0x3D bytes
    0x7474339A (File and line number not available): kernel32.dll!BaseThreadInitThunk + 0x12 bytes
    0x76EC9EF2 (File and line number not available): ntdll.dll!RtlInitializeExceptionChain + 0x63 bytes
    0x76EC9EC5 (File and line number not available): ntdll.dll!RtlInitializeExceptionChain + 0x36 bytes
  Data:
    00 00 00 00    01 00 00 00    60 F8 68 00    80 00 00 00     ........ `.h.....
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........
    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD    CD CD CD CD     ........ ........

But I don't understand where it's this data leaking, I hope I made myself clear.

Thanks beforehand

share|improve this question
    
What do the push and clear methods do? Well ... I can guess what they are supposed to do, but it kind of looks like the leak is in the push method (as if the clear is maybe not clearing the queue). –  Mark Wilkins Oct 8 '12 at 22:42
    
Yes, I'm using the concurrent_queue of Visual Studio 2012, but that clear it's outside of my loop so when the thread ends, clean up all the data, but even doing that it keeps sending me that leak. –  oscar.rpr Oct 8 '12 at 22:43
    
You should add an assignment operator to PACKET because you can't risk the implicit one copying the buf pointer leading to a double free. –  Ben Jackson Oct 11 '12 at 0:48
    
Yes, I already add one and the error it's exactly the same. –  oscar.rpr Oct 11 '12 at 0:52
    
Is there other thread that call MAC_in_queue.try_pop() concurrently? If yes, it may cause undefined behavior because concurrent_queue::clear is NOT concurrency-safe. –  yohjp Oct 13 '12 at 5:57
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted
+50

At the beginning of while ( 1 ) loop in PHY_in_Thread() you allocate recBuf:

char* recBuf = new char[BUFLEN + 1];

but at the end of the loop body, you miss to free it; you just leak the memory due to recBuf = nullptr; assignment.

Instead, try with proper recBuf deletion at the end of loop body:

delete [] recBuf;
recBuf = nullptr;
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Your assignment operator does not free the old contents in the PACKET before allocating the copy of "that." So if you overwrite an entry in some container code, the buffer held by the over-written item would leak. That's a leak, but of course I can't prove it is the leak that you are seeing.

share|improve this answer
    
I just did that in my function and I put a breakpoint in the first line of my assignment operator but it never goes there, it never break in that point and the leak keeps happening –  oscar.rpr Oct 12 '12 at 5:26
    
looks like you changed your code, now I would say the leak is exactly what @Mr.C64 says above, you never clean up the original buffer "recBuf", since you are missing the call to delete [] recBuf; –  Ammo Goettsch Oct 12 '12 at 20:34
    
to clarify: as your code stands now, you construct a temporary PACKET from recBuf, which makes a copy of the buffer in the constructor from buffer+len. Provided the container classes (queue) you use are correct, this will be further copied and those copies freed later. The temporary PACKET you created frees its buffer copy when it destructs immediately after the call to "push(...)" returns. But the original "recBuf" is never freed in the success case. –  Ammo Goettsch Oct 12 '12 at 20:41
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you have allocated recBuf in the beginning of the while(1) loop with this command:

char* recBuf = new char[BUFLEN + 1];

then you pass it to a temp variable PACKET(recBuf, numbytes) which will live only for the scope of one line of code:

MAC_in_queue.push(PACKET(recBuf, numbytes));

now, assume that MAC_in_queue initialised like this:

concurrent_queue<PACKET> MAC_in_queue

This means that you will be using a copy constructor and operator= at the same time. Because you do not free the memory allocated for buf in either of this commands, you have a leak.

Please read this article that has an example similar to yours. See how they implemented Copy constructor and operator =

share|improve this answer
    
I just did that in my function and I put a breakpoint in the first line of my assignment operator but it never goes there, it never break in that point and the leak keeps happening. –  oscar.rpr Oct 12 '12 at 5:26
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It seems to me that your packetQueue is not doing much (apart memory management, that is not working properly).

You could implement your class using a standard container. Assuming that you do not want a reference counting implementation of your class we need to rule-out std::string, but you could use std::vector. For example:

class PacketQueue
{
public:
    PacketQueue() : buf_() {}
    PacketQueue(char* buffer, int len) : buf_(buffer,buffer + len) {}
    //here your function to return the '\0' terminated buffer
    //and all the other stuff that you need
private:
    std::vector<char> buf_;
};

Please note, the default: copy constructor, assignment operator and destructor are ok, you do not need to implement anything of that. Basically the memory management is encapsulated into std::vector.

Also this is strong exception safe guarantee. Your code is not.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course in modern C++ we could use std::vector and be happy with it. But read the question: "By the way, I know there is a awful mix of C and C++, but I can't do anything about it, it's based on class code and I can't modified that, I know that this is not a good way to do it and I need to use char* as requisite." –  Mr.C64 Oct 12 '12 at 15:41
    
you are not saying anywhere that you cannot use standard container. Also you mentioned that you cannot change a class, but I assumed it wasn't PacketQueue because you added the assignment operator to it. In your code you use string (std::string?) and std::transform, so I thought you have access to std::vector as well. Are you the owner of packetQueue? Can you use standard container? –  Alessandro Teruzzi Oct 12 '12 at 15:48
    
This is something the OP should clarify. If he can use std::vector and modern C++ and drop raw-C-style, then there are several points of improvements, including some new[]'s in the body of the thread function (e.g. recBuf, temporalBuffer), that can be updated using std::vector. –  Mr.C64 Oct 12 '12 at 16:24
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I can only suggest what others before me. The leak is in your while loop, allocating recBuf but there is no appropiate delete for it. In details:

//Allocates memory,ok
char* recBuf = new char[BUFLEN + 1];

//free memory when exits, ok
if ( (numbytes = recvfrom(...)) == -1)
{
    cerr << "Could not receive datagram." << endl;
    delete[] recBuf;
    ...
}

//do something with it

//And here is the problem
MAC_in_queue.push(PACKET(recBuf, numbytes));
//With this you call this constructor
// packetQueue(char* buffer, int len)
// which allocates the same amount of memory, and copies the contents of recBuf
//So, there is a +1 memory allocation

// This is not deallocate memory :)
recBuf = nullptr;

I suggest to move the recBuf memory allocation outside of the loop, and delete it at the end( with delete[] recBuf )

delete[] recBuf;
MAC_in_queue.clear();

, with this, you don't allocate needlesly every time,therefore making it somewhat faster. Or if you prefer this way, you should insert a code like this:

 delete[] recBuf;
 recBuf = nullptr;
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