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I'm currently working on a simple Client/Server model which sends packets within TCP packets (like HTTP) and the commands are basically ints (the first 4 bytes of each packet) and I'd like to work out an efficient way of how to process these commands.

The most obvious answer would be to write thousands of if's or do one huge switch statement with thousand cases, but isn't there any better way?

I'd like to create an array of events and then just raise the corresponding index so each int refers to one event which is named (such as MessageReceived). I'd also save time I think, so how could I work this out?

EDIT: The Server handles multiple connections, one for each client that is connected, so creating seperate connections for each command(s) isn't that useful in my case.

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If they are somewhat logically grouped (like HTTP codes) you should should be able to nest if blocks. Try to structure your code around its underlying logic. If you have a bunch of sequential ints, you should have a bunch of sequential if or case statements. –  Steve Konves Oct 8 '12 at 22:24
    
How do you know which code corresponds to which event? You must have a definition somewhere... right? –  Lirik Oct 8 '12 at 22:28
    
What you really want is a state machine, it is what is used for situations like this. Forget about the if statement and look up how to do a state machine instead. –  Arjang Oct 8 '12 at 22:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Sound like a job for enums!

enum YourEnum   
{
  DoThis,
  DoThat
}

YourEnum foo = (YourEnum)yourInt;

Visual studio can even create your entire switch statement using the built in snippets and your code becomes very readable.

switch(foo)

becomes

switch(foo)
{
  case YourEnum.DoThis:
    break;
  case YourEnum.DoThat:
    break;
  default:
    break;
}

Update 1

This is a little scary from a maintainability point of view, but if you created a class like:

public class ActionProcessor
{
  public void Process(int yourInt)
  {
    var methods = this.GetType().GetMethods();
    if (methods.Length > yourInt)
    {
      methods[yourInt].Invoke(this, null);
    }
  }

  public DoThis()
  {
  }

  public DoThat()
  {
  }

or a little nicer but harder to maintain:

[AttributeUsageAttribute(AttributeTargets.Method, 
                         Inherited = false, 
                         AllowMultiple = false)]
public sealed class AutoActionAttribute : Attribute
{ 
  public AutoActionAttibute(int methodID)
  {
    this.MethodID = methodID;
  }
  public int MethodID { get; set; }
}

public class ActionProcessor
{
  public void Process(int yourInt)
  {
    var method = this.GetType().GetMethods()
      .Where(x => x.GetCustomAttribute(typeof(AutoActionAttribute), 
                                       false) != null
                  && x.GetCustomAttribute(typeof(AutoActionAttribute), 
                                       false).MethodID == yourInt)
      .FirstOrDefault();

    if (method != null)
    {
      method.Invoke(this, null);
    }
  }

  [AutoAction(1)]
  public DoThis()
  {
  }

  [AutoAction(2)]
  public DoThat()
  {
  }
}

Update 2 (Coding what I think Josh C. was talking about)

// Handles all incoming requests.
public class GenericProcessor
{
  public delegate void ActionEventHandler(object sender, ActionEventArgs e);

  public event ActionEventHandler ActionEvent;

  public ProcessAction(int actionValue)
  {
    if (this.ActionEvent != null)
    {
      this.ActionEvent(this, new ActionEventArgs(actionValue));
    }
  }
}

// Definition of values for request
// Extend as needed
public class ActionEventArgs : EventArgs
{
  public ActionEventArgs(int actionValue)
  {
    this.ActionValue = actionValue;
  }

  public virtual int ActionValue { get; private set; }
}

This you create the SomeActionProcessor that is responsible for some value:

// Handles a specific (or multiple) requests
public class SomeActionProcessor
{
  public void HandleActionEvent(object sender, ActionEventArgs e)
  {
    if (e.ActionValue == 1)
    {
      this.HandleAction();
    }
  }

  private void HandleAction()
  {
  }
}

Then create the classes and wire them up:

GenericProcessor gp = new GenericProcessor();
SomeActionProcessor sap = new SomeActionProcessor();
gp.ActionEvent += sap.HandleActionEvent;

The fire away and sending the generic processor requests:

gp.ProcessAction(1);
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks for your response, I did this before. However after all I have to use the switch and it's thousand cases of loads of if's, wouldn't it be more efficient to somehow put all events in an array and to just address the index of the corresponding away then? Once again, thanks a lot! –  hl2mukkel Oct 8 '12 at 22:25
    
Updated to use some reflection stuff as another option. –  Erik Philips Oct 8 '12 at 22:35
    
Oh wow okay! Well I guess I'll just go with the first option since I don't wanna put all of those methods in the Client.cs class :) Thanks for your effort! –  hl2mukkel Oct 8 '12 at 22:44
    
This could also use reflection to determine the class (instead of methods) to instantiate using reflection and pass data to the class in any method you wanted too. It's not limited to a single class. –  Erik Philips Oct 8 '12 at 22:50
    
Ah yeah, good idea! Also, doesn't have (yourInt) to be (yourInt + 1) in this case, because of "Process" being the first method? Sorry, I am not too particulary aware of this topic so I'm just wondering whether the methods are listed in order or by alphabet? That's the basic concept of events either, isn't it? Thanks for all your answers :) –  hl2mukkel Oct 8 '12 at 22:54

You could possibly implement a publisher-subscriber model. Instead of having one listener, you would have many. Each listener would listen for at least one command. Then you can split your switch across multiple classes.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks for your response. However I'm already having a server which has one connection for each client and I think that would be a somewhat overkill if each command gets a seperate connection if that is what you mean. Thanks though! –  hl2mukkel Oct 8 '12 at 22:32
    
@hl2mukkel Then why not implement the observer pattern/publisher-subscriber within the client. The client can contain one connection that implements a publisher class. Then you have many subscriber classes that subscribe to that one publisher all within the client. –  Josh C. Oct 8 '12 at 22:36

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