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I have a thread which get some data from Internet. It seams that it is executed correctly and data is retrieved. However if I call a method which should return data it leaves me with null. From that I drew a conclusion that thread is somehow stopped just before finning.

Here is the code:

private class getHash extends AsyncTask<String, Void, String>{
    @Override
    protected String doInBackground(String... params) {
        String str = null;
        try {
            // Create a URL for the desired page
            URL url = new URL(params[0]);

            // Read all the text returned by the server
            InputStream is =  url.openStream();
            InputStreamReader isr = new InputStreamReader(is);
            BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(isr);
            str = in.readLine();
            is.close();
            isr.close();
            in.close();
        } catch (MalformedURLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        hash = str; //If I set a global variable here it gets passed without a hitch
        return str;
    }
    @Override
    protected void onPostExecute(String result) {
        hash = result; // If I comment the line above and live this one I left with a null
    }
}

EDIT: As requested adding code where the thread was called:

            getHash hashThread =  new getHash();
            hashThread.execute(new String[] {"http://www.full.path/to/the/file.hash"});


            if(hash != null && !hash.equals(localHash)){
....
share|improve this question
2  
"From that I drew a conclusion that thread is somehow stopped just before finning." -- or, you had an exception. –  CommonsWare Oct 8 '12 at 22:27
    
How are you retrieving the value to prove that it is indeed stopping before it is finished. –  Greg Giacovelli Oct 8 '12 at 22:28
    
No @CommonsWare I truly drew a conclusion there was no exception I have looked. GregGiacovelli If you may direct your attention towards code example I have given.In the end you will find two line with some explanatory comments on them. –  PovilasID Oct 8 '12 at 22:35
    
Can you post more code, specifically around the calls to these methods? My guess is a timing issue, IE you are calling this service asynchronously, but perhaps your trying to get the result before it finishes? –  FloatingCoder Oct 8 '12 at 22:49
1  
um that is not how this works. if (hash != null) ... should never work reliably like that. It happens Asynchronously. So your call to execute() will not return immediately. In fact it can't work the way you want because you would have to wait for whatever method executes to finish as it's the current task on the UI thread. The results can only be published on the next event in the UI thread. You could block your UI thread by calling hashThread.get() to retrieve that hash but you may get an ANR. Usually the onPostExecute() calls a function on your code to signal it is complete. –  Greg Giacovelli Oct 8 '12 at 23:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Whatever launched the AsyncTask

{
 ....
 getHash hashThread =  new getHash(this);
 hashThread.execute(new String[] {"http://www.full.path/to/the/file.hash"});
 return; // ok now we just have to wait for it to finish ... can't read it until then
}

// Separate callback method
public void onHashComplete(String hash) {

   if(hash != null && !hash.equals(localHash)) {
      ....
   }
   ....
 }

Now in your GetHash class

public String doInBackground(String[] params) {
    .... // don't set hash here ... it will work but you will probably read it at the wrong time.
    return str;
}

public void onPostExecute(String str) {
    onHashComplete(str); // or just do all the work in here since it is a private inner class
}

....

Hopefully that helps. Remember doInBackground() happens on the AsyncTask thread, onPostExecute() executes on the main Thread. Whatever thread called execute() is should also be the main thread. Because of the way the main thread works, you can't expect the onPostCreate() to occur until whatever callback that it was using to call execute() in the first place, finishes. So that is why I add the return.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for clearing that up. I must have missed that part whilst reading about threads and rushed to development. –  PovilasID Oct 9 '12 at 7:04

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