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I looked at the SerialPort.Write() and SerialPort.WriteLine() methods on msdn and tried them on a simple code such as the ones below but they seem very similar to me.

Can someone please explain what the main difference is in simple terms?

if (sendtoprint == true)
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < gcode.Count(); i++)
                {
                    port.Write(gcode[i]);
                }

and

if (sendtoprint == true)
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < gcode.Count(); i++)
                {
                    port.WriteLine(gcode[i]);
                }

and

if (sendtoprint == true)
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < gcode.Count(); i++)
                {
                    port.Write(gcode[i]+"\r\n");
                }
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

WriteLine appends the specified text and a newline character. Write solely appends the specified text.

For example:

Write("A");
Write("B");
Write("C");

would result in: ABC

however:

WriteLine("A");
WriteLine("B");
WriteLine("C");

would result in:

A
B
C
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From the WriteLine doc, right at the top:

[WriteLine] writes the specified string and the NewLine value to the output buffer.

WriteLine adds the NewLine character to the end of the output whereas Write does not.

So SerialPort.Write("Hello") will output "Hello" to the buffer.

And SerialPort.WriteLine("Hello") will output something like "Hello\n" to the buffer. (Depending on the current newline value)

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is that the +"\r\n" that is being added? –  Arthur Mamou-Mani Oct 8 '12 at 22:37
    
@ArthurMamou-Mani yep –  bhamby Oct 8 '12 at 22:38
    
@ArthurMamou-Mani Yes and no, the benefit of using the built in WriteLine versus the Write with a declared \r\n is that the system will append the proper newline value automatically. If you ever need it to change from \r\n to \n or vice-versa it is a much easer change than find-replacing. –  TheZ Oct 8 '12 at 22:41
    
@TheZ The downside to NewLine value being added automatically is that some hardware communication protocols expect it to be \r, \n or \r\n (or they may want some other character to indicate end of communication), and NewLine value is system dependant. –  Arie Oct 9 '12 at 12:22
    
@Arie That is true, I suppose the best compromise would be to create your own CustomPortWrite function that by default uses one line ending (the more frequently needed one) but that can take an argument to trigger different line endings. –  TheZ Oct 9 '12 at 15:42
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I believe the only difference is that the WriteLine method adds the \n so the next data stream will be printed on a new line. This is the same for Console.Write() and Console.WriteLine().

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