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I am running a function in R that can take a long time to run as it carries out multiple commands to transform and subset some data before it pushes it into ggplot to plot. I need to run this function multiple times adjusting the arguments values. The example I will provide is a simple one...but was wondering how to speed it up? if scaled up, i.e. what is the fastest way of getting every single combination...is there a generic method of converting for loops into mclapply assuming they are faster...please feel free to provide alternative mock examples that demonstrate a preference for a particular method

mock example:

the basic function:

ff <- function(n, mu, stdev){
     x1 <- c(1:n)
     y1 <- rnorm(n,mu,stdev)
     z1 <- data.frame(cbind(x1,y1))
     ggplot(z1, aes(x=x1,y=y1))+
       geom_point()+
       labs(title=paste("n=",n,"mu=",mu, "stdev=",stdev))
}

so the nieve way of going through parameters would be to do the following...

for(i in 1:10){
    for(j in 1:2){
       for(k in seq(100,500,by=100)){
         ff(k,i,j)
       }
    }
}

what would be the fastest way of speeding this up? I'm assuming it might need something like expand.grid(x=c(1:10),y=c(1:2),z=seq(100,500,by=100)) and the using mclapply to run through each row...in some sort of parallel manner? (I have 4 cores available for this). Please feel free to pull bits out of the basic function or put things into the basic function according to the methods that would create the greatest improvement in speed. The process will obviously take longer if you increase the range for each parameter, but is there nothing that can be done about that...or can that be changed somehow too if split across more cores or something...?

and for bonus points...is there anything that will save the output images and create sliders like in the package manipulate to go through all the parameters in an interactive manner...in which all it is doing is pulling out the relevant image, rather than recalculating it each time.

N.B. Please feel free to use/suggest any other packages (like foreach) that you think might be useful for your solution

share|improve this question

Saving the output images in pretty easy. Simply call ggsave() in your ff() function.

ff <- function(n, mu, stdev){
  x1 <- c(1:n)
  y1 <- rnorm(n,mu,stdev)
  z1 <- data.frame(cbind(x1,y1))
  ggplot(z1, aes(x=x1,y=y1))+
    geom_point()+
    labs(title=paste("n=",n,"mu=",mu, "stdev=",stdev))
  ggsave(paste0(n,"_", mu, "_", stdev, ".jpeg"))
}

You were spot on with your suggestion to use expand.grid(). Here's what I'd do:

x <- expand.grid(i = 1:10, j = 1:2, k = seq(100,500,100))

And then to call it, I'd use lapply() or mclapply() if you're on Linux and have multiple cores available:

lapply(seq(nrow(x)), function(i) ff(x[i,2], x[i,1], x[i,3]))

This creates 100 jpegs that have the naming convention of "n_mu_stdev.jpeg". As for an efficient way to access these and render them on screen, I'd look into a web browser and some simple CSS and jQuery to make it purty. That's really a separate question though IMHO.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the really quick response...so...im having difficulty with the mclapply bit...but also just using lapply doesn't really provide much of a speed improvement...this was my benchmark case system.time(for(i in 1:10){for(j in 1:2){for(k in seq(100,500,by=100)){print(ff(k,i,j))}}}) which took 21.4 seconds and using lapply i did the following system.time(lapply(seq(nrow(x)), function(i) print(ff(x[i,3], x[i,1], x[i,2])))) which took 21.7 seconds... replaceing lapply with mclapply with mc.cores=4 created this error : ATSFontGetFileReference failed: error -3182. – h.l.m Oct 8 '12 at 23:22
    
@h.l.m - I wouldn't expect lapply to be appreciably faster than your for loop. I'd also wager that the majority of your time is spent in the ggplot2 bit, which can't be sped up by multiple cores. Try doctoring up some base graphics to be less ugly and you can almost certainly cut your computation time many fold. I've never seen that error before so am unfortunately not much help there. Can you get a trivial example from ?mclapply to work? – Chase Oct 8 '12 at 23:27
    
using the code on the help page for mclapply the following code works fine mclapply(1:30, rnorm, mc.cores=4) – h.l.m Oct 8 '12 at 23:31
    
@Chase you're right that ggplot itself wont be split across cores but each job will, so depending on the tradeoff between transfer and computation time, it could simply be faster because each core handles 1/4th of that list (since he has 4 cores). – Maiasaura Oct 8 '12 at 23:59
1  
But for this trivial example, llply is more than adequate to run on a single core. – Maiasaura Oct 9 '12 at 0:00

If using mclapply, combine the parameters into a list and pass that to the function rather than using a for loop.

e.g.

df <- expand.grid(i = 1:10, j = 1:2 , k = seq(100, 500, 100))
params <- mapply(list, n = df[, 3], mu = df[, 1], stdev = df[,2], SIMPLIFY = F)

ff <- function(tlist) {
    n <- tlist$n 
    mu <- tlist$mu 
    stdev <- tlist$stdev
     x1 <- c(1:n)
     y1 <- rnorm(n,mu,stdev)
     z1 <- data.frame(cbind(x1,y1))
     ggplot(z1, aes(x=x1,y=y1))+
       geom_point()+
       labs(title=paste("n=",n,"mu=",mu, "stdev=",stdev))
}

results <- llply(params, ff, .progress='text')

If using mclapply

results <- mclapply(params, ff, mc.cores = 4, mc.preschedule = TRUE)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response but i seem to keep getting errors that say "Error in 1:n : NA/NaN argument\n" and can't work out how to fix it... – h.l.m Oct 8 '12 at 23:24
    
To rule out issues with mclapply do it with llply first (remove mc.cores and mc.preschedule) and see if the same errors come up. If so, the function is not correctly reading each list item. see params[1] to make sure all 3 are in each. – Maiasaura Oct 8 '12 at 23:31
    
this is what my params[1] looks like> params[1] [[1]] [[1]]$i [1] 1 [[1]]$j [1] 1 [[1]]$k [1] 100 so I am not too sure what to adjust as i changed the last line to llply(params, ff) and get the same error... – h.l.m Oct 8 '12 at 23:41
    
my bad, I've updated my answer to a fully working example. – Maiasaura Oct 8 '12 at 23:57
    
so the solutions seem to work now...but only once you type results in both scenarios, which seem to take roughly the same amount of time, is the difference in the pre-processing of the data before-hand? furthermore if trying to put it inside a system.time() function to check which is faster the results don't print, so adjusting the function with h <- ggplot(...) and print(h) inside ff, errors are thrown up... also can the .parallel argument in llply be used? – h.l.m Oct 9 '12 at 0:37

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