Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a base class which derives from boost::enable_shared_from_this, and then another class which derives from both the base class and boost::enable_shared_from_this:

#include <boost/enable_shared_from_this.hpp>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>

using namespace boost;

class A : public enable_shared_from_this<A> { };

class B : public A , public enable_shared_from_this<B> {
public:
    using enable_shared_from_this<B>::shared_from_this;
};

int main() {
shared_ptr<B> b = shared_ptr<B>(new B());
shared_ptr<B> b_ = b->shared_from_this();

return 0;
}

This compiles but at runtime it gives

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'boost::exception_detail::clone_impl<boost::exception_detail::error_info_injector<boost::bad_weak_ptr> >'
  what():  tr1::bad_weak_ptr
Aborted

What is causing this, and is there some way around it?

EDIT:

What if I need something like this:

class A : public enable_shared_from_this<A> { };
class B : public enable_shared_from_this<B> { };    

class C : public A, public B, public enable_shared_from_this<C> {
public:
    using enable_shared_from_this<C>::shared_from_this;
};

such that A and B both need shared_from_this on their own (and one can't inherit it from the other), and C needs A, B, and shared_from_this?

share|improve this question
    
I know that b_ would be the same as b and in this case I could just use b. But this is just a demonstration; other cases in which I actually need to use shared_from_this will cause the same error. –  Ken Oct 8 '12 at 23:28
    
My solution in that case would involve virtual inheritance. I suspect boost may already have a class for this, perhaps a non-templated version of enable_shared_from_this. But if it didn't, I'd create my own and virtually inherit from it anywhere I needed the functionality. You'd have to use dynamic_pointer_cast instead of static_pointer_cast of course. But it'd work. –  Omnifarious Oct 9 '12 at 1:04
    
Yeah - I can't see an obviously clean way to make this work. It's close to diamond inheritance, and probably suggests that a rethink of the design is in order. –  Fraser Oct 9 '12 at 1:16
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's how I would solve your problem:

#include <boost/enable_shared_from_this.hpp>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>

using namespace boost;

class virt_enable_shared_from_this :
   public enable_shared_from_this<virt_enable_shared_from_this>
{
 public:
   virtual ~virt_enable_shared_from_this() {}
};

template <class T>
class my_enable_shared_from_this : virtual public virt_enable_shared_from_this
{
 public:
   shared_ptr<T> shared_from_this() {
      return dynamic_pointer_cast<T>(virt_enable_shared_from_this::shared_from_this());
   }
};

class A : public my_enable_shared_from_this<A> { };

class B : public my_enable_shared_from_this<B> { };

class C : public A, public B, public my_enable_shared_from_this<C> {
 public:
   using my_enable_shared_from_this<C>::shared_from_this;
};

int main() {
   shared_ptr<C> c = shared_ptr<C>(new C());
   shared_ptr<C> c_ = c->shared_from_this();

   return 0;
}

This is painful and at least a bit ugly. But it works reasonably well, after a fashion. I think Fraser's idea of re-thinking your design is likely the better option.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand the purpose of virt_enable_shared_from_this without it inheriting virtually from enable_shared_from_this. –  Matthieu M. Oct 9 '12 at 7:34
    
@MatthieuM.: enable_shared_from_this is a template. So everybody virtually inheriting from a template isn't going to help the situation because each of those template instances is different. virt_enable_shared_from_this is to give a common base class for everybody to virtually inherit from. –  Omnifarious Oct 9 '12 at 15:39
    
I think you could replace dynamic_pointer_cast with static_pointer_cast it is safe here...and faster –  kassak Mar 21 '13 at 14:17
    
@kassak: Maybe. I don't want to risk it. virtual base classes can float around inside the class layout in interesting ways. –  Omnifarious Mar 21 '13 at 16:30
    
I was not right it won't even compile =) sorry –  kassak Mar 21 '13 at 16:31
add comment

You shouldn't inherit from enable_shared_from_this more than once in a given inheritance chain.

In this case, you can leave the base class A inheriting from enable_shared_from_this, and have the derived class B return a shared_ptr<A> and then static_pointer_cast it to shared_ptr<B>.

Or as Omnifarious pointed out, you could have a function in B which does this for you. Although, rather than overloading shared_from_this() I would favour explicitly-named functions to minimise surprises for clients of the class:

#include <boost/enable_shared_from_this.hpp>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>

using boost::shared_ptr;

class A : public boost::enable_shared_from_this<A> { };

class B : public A {
public:
    using enable_shared_from_this<A>::shared_from_this;
    shared_ptr<B> shared_B_from_this() {
        return boost::static_pointer_cast<B>(shared_from_this());
    }
    shared_ptr<B const> shared_B_from_this() const {
        return boost::static_pointer_cast<B const>(shared_from_this());
    }
};

int main() {
    shared_ptr<B> b = shared_ptr<B>(new B);
    shared_ptr<B> b1 = boost::static_pointer_cast<B>(b->shared_from_this());
    shared_ptr<B> b2 = b->shared_B_from_this();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or even better, overload shared_from_this in the derived class to do the cast for you. –  Omnifarious Oct 9 '12 at 0:15
    
I was afraid the answer was going to be something like that. Here's a situation that's a little closer to what I actually have: class A : public enable_shared_from_this<A> { }; class B : public enable_shared_from_this<B> { }; class C : public A, public B, public enable_shared_from_this<C> { public: using enable_shared_from_this<C>::shared_from_this; }; so you can see A cannot get shared_from_this through inheritance from B (or vis-versa). So how can use use shared_from_this in all of A, B, and C? –  Ken Oct 9 '12 at 0:38
    
gah the comment system removes new lines, which makes it almost unreadable.. I'll edit my original question as well. –  Ken Oct 9 '12 at 0:41
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.