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I think I have the right idea but there's some syntax/convention thing I'm messing up, because I get the error "Global symbol %timeHash requires explicit package name".

Code:

foreach $key (sort hashValueDescendingNum (keys(%timeHash))) {
   print "\t$key\t\t $timeHash{$key}\n";
}



sub hashValueDescendingNum {
   my $hash = shift;
   $hash{$b} <=> $hash{$a};
}
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On the face of, the problem is not the function notation but the reference to %timeHash... Normally, I'd write keys %timeHash, but I don't think the difference triggers the error you're getting. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 8 '12 at 23:32
    
That's true, there is something else wrong somewhere else in your code. Apparently %timeHash is not declared. –  Dondi Michael Stroma Oct 8 '12 at 23:38
    
Above I have "my $timeHash = {}" - is this incorrect? –  JDS Oct 8 '12 at 23:39
1  
It is not correct. $timeHash = {} declares a scalar reference to a hash, not a hash. You can use %timeHash = () or dereference the first with %$timeHash. –  Dondi Michael Stroma Oct 8 '12 at 23:40
1  
You can declare the loop variable easily by writing foreach my $key instead of foreach $key. –  Dondi Michael Stroma Oct 8 '12 at 23:48
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Inline

foreach my $key (sort { $timeHash{$b} <=> $timeHash{$a} } keys %timeHash) {
   print "\t$key\t\t $timeHash{$key}\n";
}

Using a custom sort function the way you are trying to will not work well, because then your sub would need to access the original hash.

foreach my $key (sort hashValueDescendingNum (keys(%timeHash))) {
    print "\t$key\t\t $timeHash{$key}\n";
}

sub hashValueDescendingNum {
   $timeHash{$b} <=> $timeHash{$a}; # Ew.
}

Instead you can abstract it further:

foreach my $key (sortedHashKeysByValueDescending(%timeHash)) {
    print "\t$key\t\t $timeHash{$key}\n";
}

sub sortedHashKeysByValueDescending {
  my %hash = @_;
  my @keys = sort { $hash{$b} <=> $hash{$a} } keys %hash;
  return @keys;
}

The code is not efficient because it passes around the %hash though, references would be better:

foreach my $key (sortedHashKeysByValueDescending(\%timeHash)) {
    print "\t$key\t\t $timeHash{$key}\n";
}

sub sortedHashKeysByValueDescending {
  my $hash = shift;
  return sort { $hash->{$b} <=> $hash->{$a} } keys %$hash;
}
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Could I see with using that subroutine? Seems like less typing than doing it inline every time. –  JDS Oct 8 '12 at 23:38
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use List::UtilsBy qw( rev_nsort_by );

foreach my $key ( rev_nsort_by { $timeHash{$_} } keys %timeHash ) {
    ...
}
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