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I can't understand the following atoi implementation code, specifically this line: k = (k<<3)+(k<<1)+(*p)-'0';

The code:

int my_atoi(char *p) {
    int k = 0;
    while (*p) {
        k = (k<<3)+(k<<1)+(*p)-'0';
        p++;
     }
     return k;
}

Can someone explain it to me ?

Another question: what should be the algorithm of atof implementation ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted
k = (k<<3)+(k<<1);

means

k = k*2³ + k*2¹

Does that help?

The *p-'0' term adds the value of the next digit; this works because C requires that the digit characters have consecutive values, so that '1'=='0'+1, '2'=='0'+2, etc.

As for your second question (atof), that should be its own question, and it's the subject for a thesis, not something simple to answer...

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not much... I need to understand the algorithm of it... –  Adam Oct 9 '12 at 0:11
    
@Adam The algorithm is simply "For each new digit, multiply the value of the preceding digits by 10 and add the new digit". Note the problems mentioned by Karoly Horvath in his answer, though, if the input contains anything but decimal digits, you'll get garbage - in particular, it doesn't handle negative numbers. And if the input is too long, you'll have overflow and undefined behaviour. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 9 '12 at 0:19
    
Now it's much better... can you show me the code for it without bitwise ? another issue what should be atof algorithm ? –  Adam Oct 9 '12 at 0:22

<< is bit shift, (k<<3)+(k<<1) is k*10, written by someone who though he is more clever than a compiler (well, he was wrong...)

(*p) - '0' is substracting 0 from the character pointed by p, effectively converting the character to a number.

I hope you can figure out the rest.. just remember how the decimal system works.

Note, that this is note a standard conforming atoi implementation. Sorry for not quoting the standard, but this will work just as fine (from: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/atoi/ )

The function first discards as many whitespace characters (as in isspace) as necessary until the first non-whitespace character is found. Then, starting from this character, takes an optional initial plus or minus sign followed by as many base-10 digits as possible, and interprets them as a numerical value.

The string can contain additional characters after those that form the integral number, which are ignored and have no effect on the behavior of this function.

If the first sequence of non-whitespace characters in str is not a valid integral number, or if no such sequence exists because either str is empty or it contains only whitespace characters, no conversion is performed and zero is returned.

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8  
+1 for "well he was wrong" :-) –  R.. Oct 9 '12 at 0:00
2  
"he was wrong" - Um, maybe, maybe not. It depends on the compiler and when said implementation was written. Perhaps this was written some time ago when optimizing compilers weren't nearly as good. There's no reason to go back and change it now. Writers of standard library implementations have to deal with many (many) more use cases then we typically do. –  Ed S. Oct 9 '12 at 0:02
2  
@aroth: "Improving performance by obfuscating code is never a good idea" - You almost always make a piece of code harder to understand when optimizing it, and from time to time it does in fact get quite tricky (a comment is warranted in that case though). Sometimes things really do require very low level optimizations, and unless you have that rare breed of user who cares more about code quality than performance, saying that it is "never a good idea" is just silly. I think Duff's Device would like to have a chat. –  Ed S. Oct 9 '12 at 0:10
2  
I disagree with both of you. Moore's Law ended 5+ years ago; cpus are not getting faster anymore, they're just getting more cores, which generally does not help the end user perceptibly. However, it would take a pathologically bad compiler not to choose the best way of performing multiplication by a constant. Writing the multiplication by 10 as bitshifts is not an optimization; it's an expression of the assembly-language code the author wanted the compiler to generate on a particular machine, which is not what should be expressed by C. –  R.. Oct 9 '12 at 4:21
1  
@R.. - Hooray for disagreement! Although Moore's Law is still going strong. You're correct that most new transistors go towards adding cores, however some go towards architectural improvements that increase IPC, and process improvements allow for higher clock speeds. So single-threaded performance is still improving with each iteration (by about 10-20%). Not by the full 2x, but still enough to be noticeable and to eclipse gains that might be made by obfuscating code here and there. –  aroth Oct 10 '12 at 0:03
#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <limits.h>

double atof(const char *string);

int debug=1;

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char *str1="3.14159",*str2="3",*str3="0.707106",*str4="-5.2";
    double f1,f2,f3,f4;
    if (debug) printf("convert %s, %s, %s, %s\n",str1,str2,str3,str4);
    f1=atof(str1);
    f2=atof(str2);
    f3=atof(str3);
    f4=atof(str4);

    if (debug) printf("converted values=%f, %f, %f, %f\n",f1,f2,f3,f4);
    if (argc > 1)
    {
        printf("string %s is floating point %f\n",argv[1],atof(argv[1]));
    }
}

double atof(const char *string)
{
    double result=0.0;
    double multiplier=1;
    double divisor=1.0;
    int integer_portion=0;

    if (!string) return result;
    integer_portion=atoi(string);

    result = (double)integer_portion;
    if (debug) printf("so far %s looks like %f\n",string,result);

    /* capture whether string is negative, don't use "result" as it could be 0 */
    if (*string == '-')
    {
        result *= -1; /* won't care if it was 0 in integer portion */
        multiplier = -1;
    }

    while (*string && (*string != '.'))
    {
        string++;
    }
    if (debug) printf("fractional part=%s\n",string);

    // if we haven't hit end of string, go past the decimal point
    if (*string)
    {
        string++;
        if (debug) printf("first char after decimal=%c\n",*string);
    }

    while (*string)
    {
        if (*string < '0' || *string > '9') return result;
        divisor *= 10.0;
        result += (double)(*string - '0')/divisor;
        if (debug) printf("result so far=%f\n",result);
        string++;
    }
    return result*multiplier;
}
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Interestingly, the man page for atoi doesn't indicate setting of errno so if you're talking any number > (2^31)-1, you're out of luck and similarly for numbers less than -2^31 (assuming 32-bit int). You'll get back an answer but it won't be what you want. Here's one that could take a range of -((2^31)-1) to (2^31)-1, and return INT_MIN (-(2^31)) if in error. errno could then be checked to see if it overflowed.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>  /* for errno */
#include <limits.h> /* for INT_MIN */
#include <string.h> /* for strerror */

extern int errno;

int debug=0;
int atoi(const char *c)
{
    int previous_result=0, result=0;
    int multiplier=1;

    if (debug) printf("converting %s to integer\n",c?c:"");
    if (c && *c == '-')
    {
        multiplier = -1;
        c++;
    }
    else
    {
        multiplier = 1;
    }
    if (debug) printf("multiplier = %d\n",multiplier);
    while (*c)
    {
        if (*c < '0' || *c > '9')
        {
            return result * multiplier;
        }
        result *= 10;
        if (result < previous_result)
        {
            if (debug) printf("number overflowed - return INT_MIN, errno=%d\n",errno);
            errno = EOVERFLOW;
            return(INT_MIN);
        }
        else
        {
            previous_result *= 10;
        }
        if (debug) printf("%c\n",*c);
        result += *c - '0';

        if (result < previous_result)
        {
            if (debug) printf("number overflowed - return MIN_INT\n");
            errno = EOVERFLOW;
            return(INT_MIN);
        }
        else
        {
            previous_result += *c - '0';
        }
        c++;
    }
    return(result * multiplier);
}

int main(int argc,char **argv)
{
    int result;
    printf("INT_MIN=%d will be output when number too high or too low, and errno set\n",INT_MIN);
    printf("string=%s, int=%d\n","563",atoi("563"));
    printf("string=%s, int=%d\n","-563",atoi("-563"));
    printf("string=%s, int=%d\n","-5a3",atoi("-5a3"));
    if (argc > 1)
    {
        result=atoi(argv[1]);
        printf("atoi(%s)=%d %s",argv[1],result,(result==INT_MIN)?", errno=":"",errno,strerror(errno));
        if (errno) printf("%d - %s\n",errno,strerror(errno));
        else printf("\n");
    }
    return(errno);
}
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