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I'm trying to parse a JSON rpc 2.0 request. The standard is defined here.

I've defined my class as:

 [DataContract]
     public class JsonRpc2Request
     {
         public string method;
         [DataMember(Name = "params")]
         public object parameters;
         public object id;
     }

I then try and parse a request as follows:

JavaScriptSerializer ser = new JavaScriptSerializer();
var obj = ser.Deserialize<JsonRpc2Request>(Message.Trim());

obj.parameters is always null. I think this is because I can't define an object with the name params as per the JSON RPC spec. (My attempt is using the [DataMember(Name="params")] decoration.

How can I populate my parameters object when the JSON RPC spec calls for the name params which is a keyword in c#?

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2 Answers 2

You can use the DataContractJsonSerializer:

DataContractJsonSerializer ser = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(JsonRpc2Request));
MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(Message.Trim()));

var obj = ser.ReadObject(stream);

and you'll want to annotate method and id with the DataMember attribute as well.

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I would use Json.Net to get the full control over serialization/deserialization process

string json = @"{""method"":""mymethod"",""params"":[1,2],""id"":3}";
var rpcReq = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<JsonRpc2Request>(json);


public class JsonRpc2Request
{
    [JsonProperty("method")]
    public string Method;

    [JsonProperty("params")]
    public object[] Parameters;

    [JsonProperty("id")]
    public string Id;
}

Since after completing this step, you are going to have to deal with more complex cases like

 @"{""method"":""mymethod"",""params"":[{""name"":""joe""}],""id"":3}";
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