Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I run:

FILE* pFile = fopen("c:\\08.bin", "r");
fpos_t pos;
char buf[5000];

int ret = fread(&buf, 1, 9, pFile);
fgetpos(pFile, &pos);

I get ret = 9 and pos = 9.

However if I run

FILE* pFile = fopen("c:\\08.bin", "r");
fpos_t pos;
char buf[5000];

int ret = fread(&buf, 1, 10, pFile);
fgetpos(pFile, &pos);

ret = 10 as expected, but pos = 11!

How can this be?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You need to open the file in binary mode:

FILE * pFile = fopen("c:\\08.bin", "rb");

The difference is cause by reading a character that the library thinks is a newline and expanding it - binary mode prevents the expansion.

share|improve this answer
2  
As noted in the C standard: "The values stored [by fgetpos()] contain unspecified information usable by the fsetpos function for repositioning the stream to its position at the time of the call to the fgetpos function." –  Michael Burr Aug 14 '09 at 17:49
    
As fine an example of standardese as I've ever read! –  anon Aug 14 '09 at 17:52

It's a Windows thing. In text mode Windows expands '\n' to 'CR''LF' on writes, and compresses 'CR''LF' to '\n' on reads. Text mode is the default mode on windows. As Neil mentions, adding 'b' into the mode string of fopen() turns off newline translations. You won't have this translation on *nix systems.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.