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I have a question about use of the goto statement in C++. I understand that this topic is controversial, and am not interested in any sweeping advice or arguments (I usually stray from using goto). Rather, I have a specific situation and want to understand whether my solution, which makes use of the goto statement, is a good one or not. I would not call myself new to C++, but would not classify myself as a professional-level programmer either. The part of the code which has generated my question spins in an infinite loop once started. The general flow of the thread in pseudocode is as follows:

void ControlLoop::main_loop()
{
    InitializeAndCheckHardware(pHardware) //pHardware is a pointer given from outside
    //The main loop
    while (m_bIsRunning)
    {
        simulated_time += time_increment; //this will probably be += 0.001 seconds
        ReadSensorData();
        if (data_is_bad) {
            m_bIsRunning = false;
            goto loop_end;
        }    
        ApplyFilterToData();
        ComputeControllerOutput();
        SendOutputToHardware();
        ProcessPendingEvents();

        while ( GetWallClockTime() < simulated_time ) {}
        if ( end_condition_is_satisified ) m_bIsRunning = false;
    }
    loop_end:
    DeInitializeHardware(pHardware);
}

The pHardware pointer is passed in from outside the ControlLoop object and has a polymorphic type, so it doesn't make much sense for me to make use of RAII and to create and destruct the hardware interface itself inside main_loop. I suppose I could have pHardware create a temporary object representing a sort of "session" or "use" of the hardware which could be automatically cleaned up at exit of main_loop, but I'm not sure whether that idea would make it clearer to somebody else what my intent is. There will only ever be three ways out of the loop: the first is if bad data is read from the external hardware; the second is if ProcessPendingEvents() indicates a user-initiated abort, which simply causes m_bIsRunning to become false; and the last is if the end-condition is satisfied at the bottom of the loop. I should maybe also note that main_loop could be started and finished multiple times over the life of the ControlLoop object, so it should exit cleanly with m_bIsRunning = false afterwards.

Also, I realize that I could use the break keyword here, but most of these pseudocode function calls inside main_loop are not really encapsulated as functions, simply because they would need to either have many arguments or they would all need access to member variables. Both of these cases would be more confusing, in my opinion, than simply leaving main_loop as a longer function, and because of the length of the big while loop, a statement like goto loop_end seems to read clearer to me.

Now for the question: Would this solution make you uncomfortable if you were to write it in your own code? It does feel a little wrong to me, but then I've never made use of the goto statement before in C++ code -- hence my request for help from experts. Are there any other basic ideas which I am missing that would make this code clearer?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
4  
"it doesn't make much sense for me to make use of RAII" It always makes sense to use RAII. Always. All of the time. –  James McNellis Oct 9 '12 at 2:43
10  
Why not use break here? –  Greg Hewgill Oct 9 '12 at 2:44
3  
If there is only one loop that you're breaking, use break; it is cleaner and clearer. If you have multiple levels of looping, or if you're inside a switch, and you need to exit all the loops, then the goto is OK. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 9 '12 at 2:48
    
This may be a more appropriate question for programmers.stackexchange.com –  JDB Oct 9 '12 at 2:48
1  
Based on what you've shown here, the RAII container could be as simple as struct HardwareInitializer { explicit HardwareInitializer(Hardware* hw) : _hw(hw) { InitializeAndCheckHardware(_hw); } ~HardwareInitializer() { DeInitializeHardware(_hw); } Hardware* _hw; }. Just make the cleanup automatic. –  James McNellis Oct 9 '12 at 3:00

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With your one, singular condition which causes the loop to break early I would simply use a break. No need for a goto that's what break is for.

However, if any of those function calls can throw an exception or if you end up needing multiple breaks I would prefer an RAII style container, this is the exact sort of thing destructors are for. You always perform the call to DeInitializeHardware, so...

// todo: add error checking if needed
class HardwareWrapper {
public:
    HardwareWrapper(Hardware *pH) 
      : _pHardware(pH) { 
        InitializeAndCheckHardware(_pHardware);
    }

    ~HardwareWrapper() {
        DeInitializeHardware(_pHardware);
    }

    const Hardware *getHardware() const {
        return _pHardware;
    }

    const Hardware *operator->() const {
        return _pHardware;
    }

    const Hardware& operator*() const {
        return *_pHardware;
    }

private:
    Hardware *_pHardware;
    // if you don't want to allow copies...
    HardwareWrapper(const HardwareWrapper &other);
    HardwareWrapper& operator=(const HardwareWrapper &other);
}

// ...

void ControlLoop::main_loop()
{
    HardwareWrapper hw(pHardware);
    // code
}

Now, no matter what happens, you will always call DeInitializeHardware when that function returns.

share|improve this answer
    
This solution is very clean. Thank you. –  Hunter Oct 9 '12 at 3:14
    
Given that there is an InitializeXXX function, I would suggest putting the initialize in the constructor, for symmetry. –  Matthieu M. Oct 9 '12 at 6:34

Avoiding the use of goto is a pretty solid thing to do in object oriented development in general.

In your case, why not just use break to exit the loop?

while (true)
{
    if (condition_is_met)
    {
        // cleanup
        break;
    }
}

As for your question: your use of goto would make me uncomfortable. The only reason that break is less readable is your admittance to not being a strong C++ developer. To any seasoned developer of a C-like language, break will both read better, as well as provide a cleaner solution than goto.

In particular, I simply do not agree that

if (something)
{
    goto loop_end;
}

is more readable than

if (something)
{
    break;
}

which literally says the same thing with built-in syntax.

share|improve this answer
    
My main concern was that the main while loop in the real code is pretty long, and so my thinking was that using break makes it a little less clear where the program flow will go upon immediately reading it. Thank you, though, for your comment. This seems like a reasonable viewpoint. –  Hunter Oct 9 '12 at 2:53
    
As long as you do not have odd spacing throughout your code, then your code should flow quite readably using the while {} braces to any experienced developer. It's particularly easy to follow the less that is outside of the loop. –  pickypg Oct 9 '12 at 3:03
    
Also, it is possible for an IDE to tell you exactly where the break will go (although I don't know whether there are IDEs that have that particular feature). –  Greg Hewgill Oct 9 '12 at 3:22
2  
@Hunter: My main concern was that the main while loop in the real code is pretty long => when a function is too long to fit comfortably on your screen, it's time to start about factoring pieces of it into smaller functions; whether you use goto or break at this point is irrelevant. –  Matthieu M. Oct 9 '12 at 6:33
    
@MatthieuM Thanks. I agree with that notion. In isolated cases, though, I find it quite annoying to factor out pieces. I'm not saying you're wrong, just that it can be annoying. When the various parts of a long sequence share a lot of contextual information, the functions need to either have many arguments or would need to share a lot of data by modifying class members, which could (somewhat) hide the causal relationship between the parts. Or, an extra, mostly meaningless object type gets created just to shuffle data. –  Hunter Oct 9 '12 at 16:25

UPDATE

If your main concern is the while loop is too long, then you should aim at make it shorter, C++ is an OO language and OO is for split things to small pieces and component, even in general non-OO language we generally still think we should break a method/loop into small one and make it short easy for read. If a loop has 300 lines in it, no matter break/goto doesn't really save your time there isn't it?

UPDATE

I'm not against goto but I won't use it here as you do, I prefer just use break, generally to a developer that he saw a break there he know it means goto to the end of the while, and with that m_bIsRunning = false he can easily aware of that it's actually exit the loop within seconds. Yes a goto may save the time for seconds to understand it but it may also make people feel nervous about your code.

The thing I can imagine that I'm using a goto would be to exit a two level loop:

while(running) 
{
    ...
    while(runnning2)
    {
        if(bad_data)
        {
            goto loop_end;
        }
    }
    ...
}
loop_end:
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Simon. The main loop is not ridiculously long (~150 lines), but is longer than one screen, at least for me. I could certainly break it up more. I have already done this to the degree I thought reasonable, however. This may belong in another question, and if so feel free to not answer, but would you make such subroutines class methods which communicate by storing data in the class, or just functions in the same translation unit which take arguments for output. –  Hunter Oct 9 '12 at 3:20
    
Well, that really depends, and I don't know what would I do until I made it ;) The rule I would mainly follow would be make each class concentrate on one area with just doing one thing, however nobody is perfect and I might made some ugly coding that I can't aware of. I'd say here leave the code as it is there if you and your team all feel OK with that goto and nobody want to remove it. –  Simon Wang Oct 9 '12 at 5:18

Instead of using goto, you should use break; to escape loops.

share|improve this answer
1  
For a single level of loop, that is true. What about multiple levels of loop? –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 9 '12 at 2:49
1  
The poster was using goto to exit out of that one single loop, therefore, break is the best (IMO) option in the OP's case. –  zsnow Oct 9 '12 at 2:52
1  
Agreed; you have answered the letter of the question. But answers that go beyond the letter of the question and answer the spirit of the question are more likely to be up-voted. The problem isn't that goto is automatically bad; it is not correct in the example, but it is not hard to devise circumstances where it is appropriate. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 9 '12 at 2:57

There are several alternative to goto: break, continue and return depending on the situation.

However, you need to keep in mind that both break and continue are limited in that they only affect the most inner loop. return on the other hand is not affected by this limitation.

In general, if you use a goto to exit a particular scope, then you can refactor using another function and a return statement instead. It is likely that it will make the code easier to read as a bonus:

// Original
void foo() {
    DoSetup();
    while (...) {
        for (;;) {
            if () {
                goto X;
            }
        }
    }
    label X: DoTearDown();
}

// Refactored
void foo_in() {
    while (...) {
        for (;;) {
            if () {
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}

void foo() {
    DoSetup();
    foo_in();
    DoTearDown();
}

Note: if your function body cannot fit comfortably on your screen, you are doing it wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is another solution definitely worth considering. –  Hunter Oct 9 '12 at 16:20

Goto is not good practice for exiting from loop when break is an option.

Also, in complex routines, it is good to have only one exit logic (with cleaning up) placed at the end. Goto is sometimes used to jump to the return logic.

Example from QEMU vmdk block driver:

static int vmdk_open(BlockDriverState *bs, int flags)
{
    int ret;
    BDRVVmdkState *s = bs->opaque;

    if (vmdk_open_sparse(bs, bs->file, flags) == 0) {
        s->desc_offset = 0x200;
    } else {
        ret = vmdk_open_desc_file(bs, flags, 0);
        if (ret) {
            goto fail;
        }
    }
    /* try to open parent images, if exist */
    ret = vmdk_parent_open(bs);
    if (ret) {
        goto fail;
    }
    s->parent_cid = vmdk_read_cid(bs, 1);
    qemu_co_mutex_init(&s->lock);

    /* Disable migration when VMDK images are used */
    error_set(&s->migration_blocker,
              QERR_BLOCK_FORMAT_FEATURE_NOT_SUPPORTED,
              "vmdk", bs->device_name, "live migration");
    migrate_add_blocker(s->migration_blocker);

    return 0;

fail:
    vmdk_free_extents(bs);
    return ret;
}
share|improve this answer

I'm seeing loads of people suggesting break instead of goto. But break is no "better" (or "worse") than goto.

The inquisition against goto effectively started with Dijkstra's "Go To Considered Harmful" paper back in 1968, when spaghetti code was the rule and things like block-structured if and while statements were still considered cutting-edge. ALGOL 60 had them, but it was essentially a research language used by academics (cf. ML today); Fortran, one of the dominant languages at the time, would not get them for another 9 years!

The main points in Dijkstra's paper are:

  1. Humans are good at spatial reasoning, and block-structured programs capitalise on that because program actions that occur near each other in time are described near each other in "space" (program code);
  2. If you avoid goto in all its various forms, then it's possible to know things about the possible states of variables at each lexical position in the program. In particular, at the end of a while loop, you know that that loop's condition must be false. This is useful for debugging. (Dijkstra doesn't quite say this, but you can infer it.)

break, just like goto (and early returns, and exceptions...), reduces (1) and eliminates (2). Of course, using break often lets you avoid writing convoluted logic for the while condition, getting you a net gain in understandability -- and exactly the same applies for goto.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation. It's also good to realize that without a break or goto in my specific case, the rest of the while loop would need to be protected by an additional if, because sending output to hardware based on bad input could be disastrous, i.e. the correct response to bad data is "stop now." –  Hunter Oct 9 '12 at 16:03

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