Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was testing the new ASP.NET 4.5 model binding for Web Forms, with a simple repository exposing an IQueryable. The repository is using EF 5, Database First approach. I'm projecting the EF auto-generated entity to use my DTO.

Everything works fine, and that's the point, I was expecting to see some kind of exception...

This is the code:

Repository

    public IQueryable<JobDto> GetJobs()
    {
        var ctx = this.contextResolver.GetCurrentContext<pubsEntities>();

        return ctx.jobs.Select(x => new JobDto
            {
                Description = x.job_desc,
                ID = x.job_id,
                Maximum = x.max_lvl,
                Minimum = x.min_lvl
            });
    }

As you can see I'm projecting my EF entity into a custom DTO and the properties are totally different.

ASPX Code behind

    public IQueryable<JobDto> gv_GetData()
    {
        return this.jobsRepository.GetJobs();
    }

ASPX

    <asp:GridView runat="server" ID="gv" AllowPaging="true" AllowSorting="true"
        DataKeyNames="ID"
        AutoGenerateColumns="true"
        SelectMethod="gv_GetData"
        ItemType="QueryRepository.JobDto, QueryRepository">
        <Columns>
            <asp:BoundField DataField="Description" HeaderText="My custom description" SortExpression="Description" />
        </Columns>
    </asp:GridView>

This works like a charm, paging and sorting out of the box when using a repository which is great (Now I do not have to use an ObjectDataSource to simplify things like paging and sorting)

My question is:

If my repository is returning IQueryable<JobDto> and the properties of my DTO do not have the same name than the properties of my EF entity (which is a different entity named: job).

How is it possible that EF can sort my GridView correctly since my GridView is configured with the property names defined in my DTO entity??? As far as I know, the dynamic sorting using LINQ is done using a string to set the order criteria. Somehow LINQ to Entities - IQueryable is auto-mapping my DTO properties to the properties exposed by my EF entity.

Can anyone help this poor soul =( to understand what's happening behind the scenes??

I ran a SQL profile just to confirm that the query is being executed correctly in the database:

SELECT TOP (10) 
[Project1].[C1] AS [C1], 
[Project1].[job_desc] AS [job_desc], 
[Project1].[job_id] AS [job_id], 
[Project1].[max_lvl] AS [max_lvl], 
[Project1].[min_lvl] AS [min_lvl]
FROM ( SELECT [Project1].[job_id] AS [job_id], [Project1].[job_desc] AS [job_desc], [Project1].[min_lvl] AS [min_lvl], [Project1].[max_lvl] AS [max_lvl], [Project1].[C1] AS [C1], row_number() OVER (ORDER BY [Project1].[job_desc] DESC) AS [row_number]
    FROM ( SELECT 
        [Extent1].[job_id] AS [job_id], 
        [Extent1].[job_desc] AS [job_desc], 
        [Extent1].[min_lvl] AS [min_lvl], 
        [Extent1].[max_lvl] AS [max_lvl], 
        1 AS [C1]
        FROM [dbo].[jobs] AS [Extent1]
    )  AS [Project1]
)  AS [Project1]
WHERE [Project1].[row_number] > 0
ORDER BY [Project1].[job_desc] DESC

Pay special attention to these lines (ASPX):

<asp:BoundField DataField="Description" SortExpression="Description" />

And the resulting SQL

ORDER BY [Project1].[job_desc] DESC
share|improve this question
    
Could it be that the IQueryable understands the mapping between Description and job_desc? This would make sense, otherwise it would be necessary to retrieve and project all entities so that the GridView could then sort them. –  nick_w Oct 9 '12 at 4:05
    
Can you confirm that sorting works for ALL your projected dto properties or its just the first (default) one? –  Wiktor Zychla Oct 11 '12 at 19:28
    
Confirmed. It works for all fields, including the auto-generated fields –  Jupaol Oct 11 '12 at 23:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

The answer to this question lies with how IQueryable operators work. As LINQ queries are executed in deferred mode, the result is not obtained as soon as the method GetJobs is called.

To enable sorting on the ASP.NET GridView, we set the property SortExpression to the column. When we click on the column to sort the data, a dynamic lambda expression is created and the OredrBy operator of is invoked on the result obtained from the SelectMethod of the GridView. We may say that, a statement of following pattern is invoked when we apply sorting :

gv_GetData().OrderBy(j => j.Description);

Execution of the operator is dependent on the type returned by GetJobs() method. Stepping another level down, we can say that the data returned to the GridView is result of:

this.jobsRepository.GetJobs().OrderBy(j => j.Description);

Stepping anothet level down, we may assume that, the final LINQ query that will be evaluated is:

ctx.jobs.Select(x => new JobDto
        {
            Description = x.job_desc,
            ID = x.job_id,
            Maximum = x.max_lvl,
            Minimum = x.min_lvl
        }).OrderBy(j => j.Description);

The SQL query will be formed after parsing all the expressions. Here, we have 2 expressions to parse : one passed to the Select operator and the other passed to the OrderBy operator. Data obtained after parsing both the expressions is used to form the SQL Query.

If we use a method returning IEnumerable as SelectMethod, we get an exception. Because, IEnumerable operators accept Func, which cannot be formed dynamically.

share|improve this answer

With this code:

return ctx.jobs.Select(x => new JobDto
    {
        Description = x.job_desc,
        ID = x.job_id,
        Maximum = x.max_lvl,
        Minimum = x.min_lvl
    });

The Select overload you're calling is actually creating a new IQueryable that affects the actual SQL emitted by EF. You're not really yet projecting the data objects to your DTO's, but rather giving EF an expression it can use to create a query for a result set that is later projected into your DTOs once the query runs. Notice that in the Select overload that's being called, an Expression<Func<Job, JobDto>> is being passed, not just a Func<Job, JobDto>. Because EF analyzes expressions, it is able to do the sophisticated translations to SQL when possible.

When the OrderBy expression is added by your GridView, it also is just modifying your IQueryable with a new expression that can be translated to SQL.

Edit:

When you call Select on the IQueryable<Job> jobs property of your context, EF is able to look at your Expression<Job, JobDto> and determine:

  1. Which columns are needed from your JobDto projection
  2. How the JobDto projection is populated from the Job table.

If you take a look at the many Expression classes in the BCL, you'll see how it can go about this. The compiler, when encountering x => new JobDto { Description = x.job_desc, ... }, creates a complex expression tree that looks something like this (I'm severely simplifying this):

LambdaExpression<Func<Job, JobDto>>
    MemberInitExpression
        NewExpression
        Bindings
            MemberAssignment
                Member = Description property
                Expression = MemberExpression representing access to the Job property
            MemberAssignment...
            MemberAssignment...
            MemberAssignment...
            etc.

You can see how this tree contains enough information for EF to walk through the expression and produce internal mappings and produce an equivalent SQL command. They're basically projecting a .NET expression to a SQL expression. Not everything has a 1:1 mapping, but in your case, you can see how straightforward the mapping is:

Job type          -> Extent1 alias   -> dbo.jobs table
JobDto projection -> Project1 alias  -> subquery

There are other projections, you'll notice; it's introducing a row number property and some mysterious property containing the value 1; I'm unsure what that's used for.

The OrderBy is then an additional augmentation where an Expression is analyzed.

share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking something like that. Could you provide more details about the process that is executed behind the scenes so I can fully understand this behavior??. I'm aware that when using IQueryable the execution will be referred until the enumerable is actually iterated. I'd like to understand what's happening in the select method that it can emit the correct SQL. For me, it seems like a map is created between both entities –  Jupaol Oct 11 '12 at 23:33

I think it's entirely possible that EF knows how to generate the query since the IQueryable probably hasn't queried for anything until the sorting is applied. I'm thinking you would get the same sql output if you were to run this:

var ctx = this.contextResolver.GetCurrentContext<pubsEntities>();

var jobs = ctx.jobs.Select(x => new JobDto
    {
        Description = x.job_desc,
        ID = x.job_id,
        Maximum = x.max_lvl,
        Minimum = x.min_lvl
    }).OrderBy(x => x.Description).ToArray();

Edit: Keeping my answer for posterity, but Jacob's is much better written.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.