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hello I am currently doing an assignment that is supposed to read in a file, use the information, and then print out another file. all using doubly linked list. Currently i am trying to just read in the file into a doubly linked list, print it out onto the screen and a file, and finally delete the list and close the program. The program works fine as long as I don't call the dlist_distroy function which is supposed to delete the string. as soon as I do it the program starts running and then a window pops up saying

"Windows has triggered a breakpoint in tempfilter.exe.

This may be due to a corruption of the heap, which indicates a bug in tempfilter.exe or any of the DLLs it has loaded.

This may also be due to the user pressing F12 while tempfilter.exe has focus.

The output window may have more diagnostic information."

I have revised the destroy and remove functions and cant understand the problem. my program is the following

main.c

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "dlinklist.h"
#include "DlistElmt.h"
#include "Dlist.h"
#include "dlistdata.h"

/****************************************************************************/

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    FILE *ifp, *ofp;
    int hour, min;
    Dlist *list;
    DlistElmt *current = NULL, *current2 = NULL;
    float temp;

    list  = (Dlist *)malloc(sizeof(list));
    element  = (DlistElmt *)malloc(sizeof(element));

    if (argc != 3) { /* argc should be 3 for correct execution */
        /* We print argv[0] assuming it is the program name */

        /* TODO: This is wrong, it should be: usage: %s inputfile outputfile */
        printf( "usage: %s filename", argv[0] );
    } else {
        // We assume argv[1] is a filename to open
        ifp = fopen(argv[1], "r");
        if (ifp == 0) {
            printf("Could not open file\n");
        } else {
            ofp = fopen(argv[2], "w");
            dlist_init(list);//, (destroy)(hour, min, temp));
            while (fscanf(ifp, "%d:%d %f ", &hour, &min, &temp) == 3) {
                current=list->tail;
                if (dlist_size(list) == 0) {
                    dlist_ins_prev(list, current, hour, min, temp);
                } else {
                    dlist_ins_next(list, current, hour, min, temp);
                }
            }
            current = list->head;
            while (current != NULL) {
                if (current==list->head) {
                    current=current->next;
                } else
                    if ((current->temp > (current->prev->temp +5)) || 
                            (current->temp < (current->prev->temp -5))) {
                        current2 = current->next
                            dlist_remove(list, current);
                        current = current2;
                    } else
                        current=current->next;
            }

            current = list->head;
            while(current != NULL) {
                printf("%d:%d %2.1lf\n",
                    current->time, 
                    current->time2, 
                    current->temp
                );
                fprintf(ofp, "%d:%d %2.1lf\n", 
                    current->time, 
                    current->time2, 
                    current->temp
                );
                current = current->next;
            }
            //dlist_destroy(list);
            //}

            fclose(ifp);
            fclose(ofp);
        }
    }

    getchar();
}

dlistdata.c

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "dlinklist.h"
#include "DlistElmt.h"
#include "dlistdata.h"

/****************************************************************************/

void dlist_init(Dlist *list)
{
    list->size = 0;
    list->head = NULL;
    list->tail = NULL;
    return;
}

void dlist_destroy(Dlist *list) {
    while (dlist_size(list) > 0) {
        dlist_remove(list, list->head);
    }
    memset(list, 0, sizeof(Dlist));

    return;
}

int dlist_ins_next(Dlist *list, DlistElmt *element, const int time, 
        const int time2, const float temp)
{
    DlistElmt *new_element;

    if (element == NULL && dlist_size(list) != 0)
        return -1;
    if ((new_element = (DlistElmt *)malloc(sizeof(new_element))) == NULL)
        return -1;

    new_element->time  = (int)time;
    new_element->time2 = (int)time2;
    new_element->temp  = (float)temp;

    if (dlist_size(list) == 0) {
        list->head = new_element;
        list->head->prev = NULL;
        list->head->next = NULL;
        list->tail = new_element;
    } else {
        new_element->next = element->next;
        new_element->prev = element;

        if (element->next == NULL)
            list->tail = new_element;
        else
            element->next->prev = new_element;
        element->next = new_element;
    }

    list->size++;

    return 0;
}

int dlist_ins_prev(Dlist *list, DlistElmt *element, const int time, 
        const int time2, const float temp)
{
    DlistElmt *new_element;

    if (element == NULL && dlist_size(list) != 0)
        return -1;

    if ((new_element = (DlistElmt *)malloc(sizeof(new_element))) == NULL)
        return -1;

    new_element->time  = (int)time;
    new_element->time2 = (int)time2;
    new_element->temp  = (float)temp;

    if (dlist_size(list) == 0){
        list->head = new_element;
        list->head->prev = NULL;
        list->head->next = NULL;
        list->tail = new_element;
    } else {
        new_element->next = element;
        new_element->prev = element->prev;

        if (element->prev == NULL)
            list->head = new_element;
        else
            element->prev->next = new_element;
        element->prev = new_element;
    }

    list->size++;

    return 0;
}

int dlist_remove(Dlist *list, DlistElmt *element)
{ /*, int time, int time2, float temp){ */

    if (element == NULL || dlist_size(list) == 0)
        return -1;
    if (element == list->head) {
        list->head = element->next;
        if (list->head == NULL)
            list->tail = NULL;
        else
            element->next->prev = NULL;
    } else {
        element->prev->next = element->next;
        if (element->next == NULL)
            list->tail = element->prev;
        else
            element->next->prev = element->prev;
    }

    free(element);

    list->size--;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Visual Studio includes an excellent debugger. Run your program with the debugger attached and break when the error occurs. Observe the state of the program and determine what in your code is incorrect. If it is not possible by that time to determine what the error is, step through the code and at each step compare the actual state of the program to the expected state. When the two do not match, you will have found where the error is. –  James McNellis Oct 9 '12 at 3:08
    
I did as you suggested and it seems that once it goes into free(element) it has some problems. not sure what I can do about that since I have no control over free(). –  Jesus Sanchez Oct 9 '12 at 4:00
    
Haven't used VS for ages. But what settings do you use for warnings? I use gcc and then as a basic: $ gcc -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -std=c<something>. You have this msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/thxezb7y.aspx - Setting appropriate warning level is clue 1. And compile all the time. This way you do not have to fix 100^N problems at once. - You should probably use /Wall - tho I'm not sure due to the "lint-like warnings" mentioned under /W 4 - as they can be a bit excessive. –  Morpfh Oct 9 '12 at 4:37

2 Answers 2

This line is bad news:

if (element->next = NULL) (Close to bottom of dlistdata.c)

You assign the NULL to element->next instead of checking if it is NULL.

== vs =.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: I stared at that for a solid minute and by the time I started typing you had it. excellent eye. –  WhozCraig Oct 9 '12 at 3:38
    
whats wrong with it? doesn't it mean that if the next element after element is null then that means that element must be the tail? and in that case it will assign the previous element as the new tail –  Jesus Sanchez Oct 9 '12 at 3:50
    
@JesusSanchez: Updated ;). - And sorry for delayed response/update. Lots my Internet-connection here :( –  Morpfh Oct 9 '12 at 3:55
    
thank you. I just fixed that but it seems that that wasn't the source of the problem because its still giving me the same error. as WhozCraig mentioned tho, good eye –  Jesus Sanchez Oct 9 '12 at 3:59

Since this is an assignment, my answer is to point you in the right direction, but I won't completely spell it out.

What do you think happens here?

dlist_remove(list, current);
current = current->next;
share|improve this answer
    
there it should remove the element that is being pointed to right there and then it becomes the next element.... although I think I see the problem, since it will be removed then it wont be able to go to the next element if I understand right. although the problem is not with that but with the remove or the free function I think because I was having problems with it before i even added that remove. –  Jesus Sanchez Oct 9 '12 at 3:55
    
Yes, the problem is that you delete the memory associated with current. You can no longer rely on it to contain anything sensible, and using it could either crash your program or cause you to delete random garbage next time around and potentially corrupt your heap. So, while another person has pointed to an issue that happens before this (which I did not notice), you also need to address this. Either store the pointer before you call dlist_remove, or have that function do it and return the value: current = dlist_remove(list, current); –  paddy Oct 9 '12 at 4:01
    
ok I have fixed the 2 errors mentioned. thank you, I still get the same problem. –  Jesus Sanchez Oct 9 '12 at 4:15

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