Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What different?

RIGHT:

select distinct maker, price from product
inner join printer
on product.model = printer.model
where color = 'y' and price <= (select min(price) from printer where color = 'y')

WRONG:

select distinct maker, price from product
inner join printer
on product.model = printer.model
where color = 'y' and price <= all (select distinct price from printer where color = 'y')

I know using "min" is better in performance. But could anyone explain what wrong and different in the result?

Tables structures:

Product(maker, model, type)
Printer(code, model, color, type, price)

neikel

share|improve this question
2  
Why would you say the second query is wrong? Does it return incorrect results? Or does it not conform to someones standards? –  astander Oct 9 '12 at 3:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

ALL is a short form for expanding the comparison operator against ALL rows, and combining the conditions with AND.
ANY is a short form for expanding the comparison operator against ALL rows, and combining the conditions with OR.

Specifically,

price <= all (select distinct price from printer where color = 'y')

expands to, assuming the subquery returns 4 rows

price <= <price1> AND
price <= <price2> AND
price <= <price3> AND
price <= <price4>

When any of those resove to NULL, the result is false because NULL is not comparable using <=. MIN doesn't have this problem (because MIN skips NULLs) except for the edge case where there is NO result row, in which case <= (select MIN..) can also give you an unexpected result.

Using ALL in to perform a test against a nullable column should almost always be qualified with a filter, e.g.

select distinct maker, price from product
inner join printer
on product.model = printer.model
where color = 'y' and price <=
      all (select distinct price from printer where color = 'y'
           where price is not null)
share|improve this answer
    
Comparing NULL with <= does not give FALSE; it gives UNKNOWN. (NULL <= 2) = FALSE is not true. –  Billy ONeal Oct 9 '12 at 4:05
    
@Billy, it returns FALSE in the context of the condition, i.e. it will not proceed, which requires a true. You yourself say in another comment that it coerces to FALSE, so if we're still discussing in the same frame of reference (return from the condition), it's as false as false can be. –  RichardTheKiwi Oct 9 '12 at 5:31
    
For the purposes of the while, yes; because where checks for true, and null is not true. But being inside the where does not change the behavior of the condition. (42 <= null) = false is still null, despite being in the where; but the way you have the above worded would lead someone to believe the reverse. Particularly when confusion around SQL's 3 valued logic is what led to the confusion in the first place, being explicit about what is actually occurring is valid. –  Billy ONeal Oct 9 '12 at 6:50
    
@RichardTheKiwi: you are right, I checked that on MS SQL 2008. –  neikel Oct 9 '12 at 8:12

The second one will fail if there is a NULL printers.price. Consider this (I'm using PostgreSQL here):

=> select 0 <= (select min(x) from (values (null), (1), (2)) as t(x));
 ?column? 
----------
 t
(1 row)

and this:

=> select 0 <= all (select x from (values (null), (1), (2)) as t(x));
 ?column? 
----------

(1 row)

That's a true result in the first case and NULL (which is false) for the second one.

share|improve this answer
1  
Technically ANSI rules would have comparison against NULL return UNKNOWN (which the where clause coerces to false). +1 –  Billy ONeal Oct 9 '12 at 3:59
    
@BillyONeal: Are there any databases with an explicit UNKNOWN? Everything I've worked with uses NULL for that. –  mu is too short Oct 9 '12 at 4:08
    
I don't think there'd be a functional difference between the two. The docs for MSSQL say that it returns an explicit UNKNOWN if ANSI NULLS is turned on; but I have not tested myself; so UNKNOWN might just be the docs' word for NULL. –  Billy ONeal Oct 9 '12 at 4:28
    
C.J. Date's comment on the standard keeps coming to mind, paraphrasing: "don't blame for NULL! I don't like it either!" –  mu is too short Oct 9 '12 at 5:18
  1. ALL is a Transact-SQL extension; it is not supported by all database engines. Oops.
  2. Performance is not negligible when talking about databases. The min solution can probably use an index to execute extremely quickly (assuming the RDBMS builds a B-tree or similar sorted index), whereas the all solution forces a full table scan.
  3. If price is allowed to be null, you will get different answers. min ignores all null values, so if price is null, the result of the min will be a number. But the result of your distinct query will attempt to compare that null against all the prices, which will return UNKNOWN for every price, which means no prices will match in the where clause.
share|improve this answer
    
If there is an index to use for MIN, would it not be able to use that exact same index for distinct? I do aggree with the multiple comparisons though. –  astander Oct 9 '12 at 3:54
    
@astander: The database can use the index for the distinct, but it cannot use the index for the all. (After all, all means compare against every result) –  Billy ONeal Oct 9 '12 at 3:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.