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I coded up a class which models a stock:

public Stock(String ticker, int shares, float purchasePrice) throws IllegalArgumentException
{
    if(ticker == null || ticker == "" ||
        shares <= 0 || purchasePrice <= 0)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(Messages.enterAppropriateValues());

    this.ticker = ticker;
    this.shares = shares;
    this.purchasePrice = purchasePrice;
    latestPrice = purchasePrice;
    updatePercentGain();
}

The copy-constructor looks like:

public Stock(Stock other) throws IllegalArgumentException
{
    this(other.ticker, other.shares, other.purchasePrice);
}

Here are the commands I that used to test this:

    Stock bac = new Stock("BAC", 100, 42.22f);
    System.out.println(bac);

    bac.setLatestPrice(43.35f);
    System.out.println(bac);

    Stock bacCopy = new Stock(bac);
    System.out.println(bacCopy);

Output is:

    BAC 100 42.22 42.22 0.00%
    BAC 100 42.22 43.35 2.68%
    BAC 100 42.22 42.22 0.00%

For some reason, the last value which represents the percent-gain is not copying over?

Here's the percent-gain method btw:

public void updatePercentGain()
{
    percentGain = ((latestPrice - purchasePrice) / purchasePrice) * 100;
}

Where am I going wrong?

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4  
This is wrong: ticker == "", instead you want to use ticker.equals(""). –  Cory Kendall Oct 9 '12 at 3:48
1  
How did this value of '43.35' get here? BAC 80 42.22 43.35 2.68% –  Cory Kendall Oct 9 '12 at 3:52
1  
It works if you're trying to see if the passed in string is the exact same local string instance declared inside the constructor which is of course impossible since it's local to the constructor. Use equals instead. Just because it compiles does not mean it's correct. –  David Harkness Oct 9 '12 at 3:53
1  
@mathisnotmyforte: It might appear to work, but it doesn't work in general. –  Greg Hewgill Oct 9 '12 at 3:53
2  
you can use == for strings, but it will always return false unless it's the same instance... in other words, no, don't use == for strings, this is Java, not Scala or JavaScript... –  Eran Medan Oct 9 '12 at 3:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When your Stock constructor runs, it initialises the latestPrice with the purchasePrice passed in to the constructor. Since these values are the same, the percent gain will be 0.00%.

If you wish to also copy the current latestPrice in your copy constructor, you'll have to do that too:

public Stock(Stock other) throws IllegalArgumentException
{
    this(other.ticker, other.shares, other.purchasePrice);
    this.latestPrice = other.latestPrice;
    updatePercentGain();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Greg! That did the trick –  Haque1 Oct 9 '12 at 4:04

In your actual constructor (not your copy constructor), you are not copying over the latestPrice, you're just setting it equals to the current price:

latestPrice = purchasePrice;

So your copy constructor is only passing over "42.22" and not "43.35", and your copy doesn't get the latestPrice.

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