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How to convert this map/flatMap into a for comprehension, and please explain how it works, thanks.

    def compute2(maybeFoo: Option[Foo]): Option[Int] =
      maybeFoo.flatMap { foo =>
      foo.bar.flatMap { bar =>
          bar.baz.map { baz =>
          baz.compute
      }
    }
  }  
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1 Answer 1

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Your code can be translated into this:

def compute2(maybeFoo: Option[Foo]): Option[Int] =
  for {
    foo <- maybeFoo
    bar <- foo.bar
    baz <- bar.baz
  } yield baz.compute

Quotes from Programming in Scala, Second Edition:

Generally, a for expression is of the form:

for ( seq ) yield expr

Here, seq is a sequence of generators, definitions, and filters, with semi-colons between successive elements.

This for expression contains one generator, one definition, and one filter:

for {
p <- persons // a generator
n = p.name // a definition
if (n startsWith "To") // a filter
} yield n

Translating for expressions with one generator

First, assume you have a simple for expression:

for (x <- expr1) yield expr2

where x is a variable. Such an expression is translated to:

expr1.map(x => expr2)

Translating for expressions starting with a generator and a filter

Now, consider for expressions that combine a leading generator with some other elements. A for expression of the form:

for (x <- expr1 if expr2) yield expr3

is translated to:

expr1 withFilter (x => expr2) map (x => expr3)

Translating for expressions starting with two generators

The next case handles for expressions that start with two generators, as in:

for (x <- expr1; y <- expr2) yield expr3

The for expression above is translated to an application of flatMap:

expr1.flatMap(x => for (y <- expr2) yield expr3)
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ok, I think I get it and in fact, I got that piece of code to work now as well as my next piece def simpleProgram : Future[Int] = { for { result <- serviceCall() } yield result } –  Dean Hiller Aug 20 at 19:31

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