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Weird question here. I have a main class which manages a bunch of event classes...I want one of the events to alter a value in the main class.

Normally, I would do something like this by using the ref keyword...but in this case, I want to pass in the reference in the constructor, and have any further modifications by the class be reflected in the main class. Is this possible? Right now I have the following:

class MainClass {
     float transparency = 0.0f;

     List<Events> listOfEvents;

     listOfEvents.Add(new FadeInEvent(ref float transparency));
}

class FadeInEvent {
     float transparency;

     public FadeInEvent(ref float t) {
         transparency = t;
     }

     public void Update()  //Occurs every frame
     {
         transparency += 0.01f;
     }
}

This does not work; the transparency in the main class is not updated by the FadeInEvent class. How can I work this out?

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2 Answers 2

You cannot keep a reference to a value type, such as float. What you can do is have a FadeInEvent constructor that takes a MainClass and modify it's public Transparency property:

class MainClass
{
    float transparency = 0.0f;
    public float Transparency
    {
        get { return transparency;}
        set { transparency = value;}
    }

    List<Events> listOfEvents;
    public void AddFadeInEvent()
    {
        listOfEvents.Add(new FadeInEvent(this));
    }
}

class FadeInEvent
{
    MainClass mainClass;

     public FadeInEvent(MainClass mainClass) 
     {
         this.mainClass = mainClass;
     }

     public void Update()  //Occurs every frame
     {
         mainClass.Transparency += 0.01f;
     }
}
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This wouldn't lead some infinite spiral recursive memory black hole? I guess if it's just a reference, it's cool, right? –  Jason Wishnov Oct 9 '12 at 5:34
    
There is no circular reference here in this example, but even if there was, there would be no problem with it. –  Eren Ersönmez Oct 9 '12 at 5:36
    
Worked like a charm. Thanks, Eren! –  Jason Wishnov Oct 9 '12 at 5:44
    
I think where you have ref float transparency you mean this. –  Andrew Russell Oct 9 '12 at 7:24
    
@AndrewRussell fixed it, thanks. –  Eren Ersönmez Oct 9 '12 at 10:31

How about creating a class for the variable as classes are pass by reference automatically:

class Transparency
{
    public float Value = 0.0f;
}

class MainClass
{
     Transparency transparency = new Transparency();

     // this List<Events> doesn't match class, but I'm sure this was just a sample of a larger problem
     List<Events> listOfEvents = new List<Events>();

     listOfEvents.Add(new FadeInEvent(transparency));
}

class FadeInEvent{
     Transparency transparency;

     public FadeInEvent(Transparency t) {
         transparency = t;
     }

     public void Update()  //Occurs every frame
     {
         transparency.Value += 0.01f;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate this answer...it's rather elegant...but it would add a lot of overhead to the project, I think, and also only allows for a one-way transfer of values. But thank you for the effort! –  Jason Wishnov Oct 9 '12 at 5:45
    
@JasonWishnov Came up with another solution –  Chuck Savage Oct 9 '12 at 6:02

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