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I'm writing a hashtable as an array of linked lists.Currently I'm trying to have a simple hash table where the key is the index of the array and value is a singly linked list for implementing chaining.

This is my code to delete a node:

Basic Struct:

struct Node
{
 int value;
 int page;   
 struct Node *next; 
};

int searchAndDelete(int frame,int page,int delete)
{
   struct Node** iter;
   iter=&hashtable[(page-1)%7];
   struct Node** prev=iter;

   for(;*iter;iter=&(*iter)->next)
   {
      if(page==((*iter)->page))
      {
         if(frame==((*iter)->value))
         {
            if(delete)
            {
               (*prev)->next=(*iter)->next;
               free(*iter);
            }
            return 1;
         }
      }
      prev=iter;
   }
   return 0;
}

For insertion please take a look here, AddNode

When I'm deleting a node, the value for that changes to 0. When I search for the node it gives back that node is not preset aka 0 as output from the function.

Are there any mistakes in my code which I haven't thought about?Am I leaving any memory leaks or any other problems?

Edit Added this piece of code to the delete function:

  int searchAndDelete(int frame,int page,int delete)
  {
   struct Node** iter;
   iter=&hashtable[(page-1)%7];
   struct Node** prev=iter;
   struct Node** curr=iter;

   for(;*curr;curr=&(*curr)->next)
   {

     if(page==((*curr)->page))
     {
        if(frame==((*curr)->value))
        {
            if(delete)
            {
                if(curr==iter)
                {

                    iter=(*curr)->next;
                    free(*curr);

                }
                else
                {

                (*prev)->next=(*curr)->next;
                free(*curr);
                }

            }

            return 1;
        }

    }
    prev=curr;

  }
    return 0;



}

Problem I'm seeing is that when I delete the first time, the element is not freed, it's value is set to 0, but it still says in the linked list. In the second deletion the value of the last elements goes to some garbage and hence that element will never be deleted in my comparison checks. Can someone shed light on what I might be doing here?

share|improve this question
1  
OT, on the off-chance you ever push this through a C++ compiler, 'delete' is a reserved word and as such the third parameter to searchAndDelete() may want a different name. Nothing to do with your question, but may save you a head-bang later. – WhozCraig Oct 9 '12 at 5:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the hash table you're using is seven elements wide (i.e. 0..6 for indexes), and from your AddNode code, it appears it is, then the arithmetic you're using is suspect for the initial iterator find.

iter=&hashtable[page-1%7];

should likely be:

struct Node** iter = hashtable + (page % 7);

This will give you the address of the element in your hash table at the page location modulus 7, i.e. [0..6].

Also, your delete from your hash table head node doesn't account for clearing the table element itself. You may need to (a) set it to null, or (b) chain in the next ptr. Do that as well. You have the ability to since the hash table and the initial node pointer are both available.

EDIT: OP asked for sample. This is just a quick jot of how this can be done. I'm sure there are plenty of better ways, maybe even ones that compile. This assumes both the page AND frame must match EXACTLY for a node to be considered delete'able.

void searchAndDelete(int frame, int page, int del)
{
    struct Node** head = hashtable + (page % hashtable_size);
    struct Node* curr = *head;
    struct Node* prev = NULL;

    while (curr)
    {
        // if they match, setup for delete.
        if ((curr->page == page) && (curr->value == frame) && del)
        {
            // so long as the header pointer is the active node prev
            //  will be NULL. move head along if this is the case
            if (prev == NULL)
                *head = curr->next;

            // otherwise, the previous pointer needs it next set to
            //  reference the next of our vicitm node (curr)
            else
                prev->next = curr->next;

            // victim is safe to delete now.
            free(curr);

            // set to the new head node if we just deleted the
            //  old one, otherwise the one following prev.
            curr = (prev == NULL) ? *head : prev->next;
        }
        else
        {   // no match. remember prev from here on out.
            prev = curr;
            curr = curr->next;
        }
    }
}

Eh, close enough =P

share|improve this answer
    
Is it essential to account for clearing the table, won't deleting the entire linked list be sufficient? – gizgok Oct 9 '12 at 7:11
    
Yes, it is essential.Your hash table should be made up of node pointers that are initially NULL. The first for each page should start that page-list in the hash table slot it belongs in. Each, included the head, are dynamically allocated and thus also need to be freed likewise. If you need a simple example I'll throw one into the answer. – WhozCraig Oct 9 '12 at 8:03
    
Please do, I would appreciate the example and remark on my edit too. – gizgok Oct 9 '12 at 8:53
    
@gizgok No problem, as I said, btw, double check the modulo for computing your hash table slot. hope the code helps. (tired, so sry if it isn't stellar). – WhozCraig Oct 9 '12 at 11:54

I see couple of issues:

  1. mod operator % needs parenthesis. So change iter=&hashtable[page-1%7]; to iter=&hashtable[(page-1)%7];

  2. Handle the case when you will delete 1st element in linked list. In such cases prev will be same as iter so (*prev)->next=(*iter)->next; will not make any different. You need to update the array to store next element aka (*iter)->next.

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