Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

How would one accomplish this? I know how to create dynamic structures, but is it possible to have a dynamic structure within another..? Say I wanted to have an invoice where a dynamic structure called Customer would include the customer ID, customer name, number of items, and then the structure for items which would contain the product description, quantity and price...

I'd appreciate any samples. I dunno, I'm at a loss and am starting to get burned out. Lets see if I can get a helping hand.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
By "dynamic structures", do you mean classes? – Martin Green Oct 9 '12 at 6:49
    
No, I mean the data form. Like... struct foo { ... ... }; – John Holly Oct 9 '12 at 6:51
2  
In C++, a structure is a class defined with the struct keyword.[1] Its members and base classes are public by default. A class defined with the class keyword has private members and base classes by default. This is the only difference between structs and classes in C++. wikipedia – johv Oct 9 '12 at 6:52
    
My apologies. Still pretty nub, its for my class. – John Holly Oct 9 '12 at 7:03
    
If by danamic structure you mean you have a pointer to some struct(or class) and use new to allocate memory to that pointer, then yes of course it's possible. :) Just have a pointer member in the structure, and allocate just the same to that member. – Joachim Pileborg Oct 9 '12 at 7:55

Yes you can, I believe you could accomplish that with an std list. (And many many other ways actually)

class Customer
{
private:
    int ID;
    ...
    std::list<Item> items;
}   


std::list<Customer> customers;

Using a dynamic array of items:

class Customer
{
public:
   Customer(int size) : nItems(size)
   {
       items = new Item[nItems];
   }
   Customer(const Customer& customer) : Customer(customer.getItems())
   {
       memcpy(items, customer.getItems(), nItems);
   }
   ~Customer() {delete [] items;}
   int getNumItems() {return nItems;}
   Item *getItems() {return items;}
private:
    int ID;
    ...
    Item *items;
    int nItems;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh my god, if only my professor would let me use things we haven't covered in our book yet... brilliant. I was going about it in pretty much exactly the manner this guy was. link is there a way I could use new for the items structure inside of the customer structure? – John Holly Oct 9 '12 at 7:01
    
Yes, but std::list takes care of dynamic allocation. If you want to do it anyway check out the edit of the answer. – imreal Oct 9 '12 at 7:10
1  
Wouldn't you need to free/delete that upon destruction? In the dynamic case that is. – johv Oct 9 '12 at 7:13
    
@johv f course, I will edit. – imreal Oct 9 '12 at 7:16
1  
You still need the copy constructor and assignment operator in that case. – KillianDS Oct 9 '12 at 7:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.