Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got 3 tables:

Schema: enter image description here

For example, I have data like:

1> select id, iddep, idservice from transactions where id = 22
2> go
 id          iddep       idservice
 ----------- ----------- -----------
          22           6          12

I run the following queries, and result is predictable:

First connection queries:

1> begin tran
2> go
1> select id from transactions with (updlock) where id = 22
2> go
 id
 -----------
          22

Second connection queries:

1> begin tran
2> go
1> delete from transactions with (nowait) where id = 22
2> go
SQL Server Error: 1222 Lock request time out period exceeded

This is normal behavior for NOWAIT hint, what is described here

But! If I do the following queries, result is very strange!

First connection queries are the same as in the first example:

1> begin tran
2> go
1> select id from transactions with (updlock) where id = 22
2> go
 id
 -----------
          22

Second connection queries:

1> begin tran
2> go
1> delete from services with (nowait) where id = 12
2> go

I just try to delete parent row and.. Nothing happens! It just waits for the row to release in despite of nowait hint. And when I release that row, parent row deletes.

So, why I don't just receive the 1222 error, as in the first example?

share|improve this question
    
In the second example, you are deleting a different row. Is this a typo? If not, Then the chances are that SQL is taking a row level lock for each, not a table level, hence they don't block each other. –  Pete Carter Oct 9 '12 at 7:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's right there in the page you link to, but maybe not obvious. NOWAIT:

Instructs the Database Engine to return a message as soon as a lock is encountered on the table. NOWAIT is equivalent to specifying SET LOCK_TIMEOUT 0 for a specific table.

Emphasis added

In the final case in your question, the DELETE isn't waiting for a lock on services (the table) - it's waiting for a lock on transactions so that it can verify that the foreign key constraint will not be violated.

And the same quote points out the way to solve it: Specify SET LOCK_TIMEOUT 0 on your second connection, and it won't wait for locks on any table.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, It helps) thx :) –  Tim Rudnevsky Oct 9 '12 at 7:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.