Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Using C++ filestreams (fstream), how can you determine the size of a file?
file size in c program

I want to retrive the size of a file and for this I implemented in this way

(void)fseek(m_fp, 0, SEEK_END); // Set the file pointer to the end of the file
pFileSize = ftell(m_fp);        // Get the file size
(void)fseek(m_fp, oldFilePos, SEEK_SET);  // Put back the file pointer at the original location

This is not feasible for out need and is ther anyother way to get the file size or check whether the file contain and data

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by MSalters, John Dibling, Peter O., t0mm13b, William Pursell Oct 10 '12 at 0:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Which operating system are you using? –  Peter Wood Oct 9 '12 at 7:12
1  
why is it not feasible to do so? –  moooeeeep Oct 9 '12 at 7:16
    
possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/q/2409504/1025391 –  moooeeeep Oct 9 '12 at 7:18
1  
@moooeeeep Because it invokes undefined behavior? From the C standard: A binary stream need not meaningfully support fseek calls with a whence value of SEEK_END., Setting the file position indicator to end-of-file, as with fseek(file, 0, SEEK_END), has undefined behavior for a binary stream... –  Alexey Frunze Oct 9 '12 at 9:08
1  
If you're not afraid of the cutting edge, std::tr2::file_size –  MSalters Oct 9 '12 at 14:18

3 Answers 3

You can use stat

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#if defined (_WIN32)
#  include <io.h> // make portable for windows
#else
#include <unistd.h>
#endif

struct stat st;
stat (filename, &st);
std::cout << st.st_size;
share|improve this answer
2  
Note that stat is not a part of C or C++ but POSIX. –  Blue Moon Oct 9 '12 at 7:07
    
fstat() or fstat64() are variations on stat() that use a FILE *. Given you already have m_fp in your code, I suggest you use fstat(). –  Concrete Gannet Oct 9 '12 at 7:12
    
fstat () uses int file handle (returned by open) and not FILE* (from fopen) –  tozka Oct 9 '12 at 7:18

If it is a binary stream, then pFileSize is the number of bytes from oldFilePos to the end of the file.

share|improve this answer
    
From the C standard: A binary stream need not meaningfully support fseek calls with a whence value of SEEK_END., Setting the file position indicator to end-of-file, as with fseek(file, 0, SEEK_END), has undefined behavior for a binary stream... –  Alexey Frunze Oct 9 '12 at 9:07

What you wrote is a 100% multiplatform way of doing what you need. Use your operating system's calls to do more, stat() on Unix-like OSes or GetFileAttributesEx() on Windows.

share|improve this answer
1  
-1. No, it's not. From the C standard: A binary stream need not meaningfully support fseek calls with a whence value of SEEK_END., Setting the file position indicator to end-of-file, as with fseek(file, 0, SEEK_END), has undefined behavior for a binary stream... –  Alexey Frunze Oct 9 '12 at 9:06
    
Is there actually such a platform that doesn't support SEEK_END in stdio? –  LubosD Oct 12 '12 at 11:50
    
I can't tell your for sure what platforms (compilers/stdlibs/OSes) don't support it, but I think I have been beaten by it once. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 12 '12 at 11:54

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.