Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There is any method to truncate a list in java, for example, to the first 100 elements, discarding the others? (I mean, without iterating and/or copying/deleting elements one by one)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 21 down vote accepted
List<String> items = Arrays.asList("1", "2", "3");
List<String> subItems = items.subList(0, 2);

You should bear in mind that subList returns a view of the items, so if you want the rest of the list to be eligible for garbage collection, you should copy the items you want to a new List:

List<String> subItems = new ArrayList<String>(items.subList(0, 2));
share|improve this answer
1  
while the question is not exactly clear, it does sound like sam wants a the end of the list deleted. Therefore your answer should include a list.clear(). –  mP. Aug 14 '09 at 23:15
    
This is not likely to perform as well as karim79's solution, which is the best alternative - it has the best chance of performing well and is the cleanest code as well. –  Lawrence Dol Aug 15 '09 at 5:08
    
I think it depends on the number of elements to be removed (and also if the List supports modification) –  Ben Lings Aug 15 '09 at 6:50
list.subList(100, list.size()).clear();

or:

list.subList(0, 100);
share|improve this answer

You did not specify the type of list. If it is an ArrayList, then

list.removeRange(100, list.size());

has cost O(1).

On the other hand, if it is a LinkedList, then removeRange will require O(list.size()) calls, and so clear() (it calls removeRange()). There appears to be no O(1) way to truncate a linked list in java, except for writing your own implementation. If the list is short, copying and losing the old reference, as suggesting by Ben Lings, is the fastest way to get what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
@tucuxi: "There appears to be no O(1) way to truncate a linked list in java". Don't blame Java. It is a fundamental property of singlely linked lists. –  Stephen C Aug 15 '09 at 4:18
7  
removeRange is protected –  Ben Lings Aug 15 '09 at 6:42
    
Or removeRange really O(1)? It has to either null the removed elements in the backing array or copy the retained elements to a new backing array. –  Ben Lings Aug 15 '09 at 7:34
    
@Ben: nulling 100 elements of an ArrayList with N elements is O(1). No copying is actually performed in this case. (I checked the OpenJDK code!) –  Stephen C Aug 15 '09 at 10:08
    
Doesn't it have to null all the removed elements (not the 100 that are being retained)? –  Ben Lings Aug 18 '09 at 11:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.