Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an existing zip file, I want to use AESManaged class to encrypt it, but I don't find where I can set the password to the zip file in that class. After researching, I found some libaries such as 'DotNetZip' can complete the task. But my file is already a .zip, I needn't to compress again, I only want to encrypt it. Anyone can help me to use AESManaged class to ahieve the purpose?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
AesManaged has nothing to do with content of the file, so it doesn't matter what is your file content (zip or ordinary file). If you want encrypt the contents of the zip file (not the zip file itself) you should unzip the file first, and send the unzipped content to AesManaged class. –  MD.Unicorn Oct 9 '12 at 7:50
    
@MD.Unicorn Thanks for your quick reply, if I want to encrypt the zip file itself, not the content, so when I uncompress it, I need to input a password, what class should I use? –  James Oct 9 '12 at 8:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know if this is what your are looking for but I created a code that encrypts any file.

Here's the code for the encrypter:

private void EncryptFile(string inputFile, string outputFile)
        {
            string password = @"yourPWhere";
            UnicodeEncoding UE = new UnicodeEncoding();
            byte[] key = CreateKey(password);

            string cryptFile = outputFile;
            FileStream fsCrypt = new FileStream(cryptFile, FileMode.Create);

            RijndaelManaged RMCrypto = new RijndaelManaged();
            IV = CreateIV(password_mTxtBx.Text);

            CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(fsCrypt,
                RMCrypto.CreateEncryptor(key,IV),
                CryptoStreamMode.Write);

            FileStream fsIn = new FileStream(inputFile, FileMode.Open);

            int data;
            while ((data = fsIn.ReadByte()) != -1)
                cs.WriteByte((byte)data);


            fsIn.Close();
            cs.Close();
            fsCrypt.Close();
        }

Here's the code for the decrypter:

        private void DecryptFile(string inputFile, string outputFile)
    {
            string password = @"yourPWhere";

            UnicodeEncoding UE = new UnicodeEncoding();
            byte[] key = CreateKey(password);
            FileStream fsCrypt = new FileStream(inputFile, FileMode.Open);
            RijndaelManaged RMCrypto = new RijndaelManaged();
            IV = CreateIV(password_mTxtBx.Text);

            CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(fsCrypt,
                RMCrypto.CreateDecryptor(key, IV),
                CryptoStreamMode.Read);

            FileStream fsOut = new FileStream(outputFile.Remove(outputFile.Length - 4), FileMode.Create);

            int data;
            while ((data = cs.ReadByte()) != -1)
                fsOut.WriteByte((byte)data);

            fsOut.Close();
            cs.Close();
            fsCrypt.Close();

        }

I saw a similar code on codeproject a few months ago. So it's not directly my work. Credits go to the author.

Updated with password-based key derivation:

    public static byte[] CreateKey(string password)
    {
        var salt = new byte[] { 1, 2, 23, 234, 37, 48, 134, 63, 248, 4 };

        const int Iterations = 9872;
        using (var rfc2898DeriveBytes = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(password, salt, Iterations))
            return rfc2898DeriveBytes.GetBytes(16);
    }

Creator for the IV (created from Password):

    public byte[] CreateIV(string password)
    {
        var salt = new byte[] { 4, 7, 21, 199, 45, 63, 138, 12, 213, 1 };

        const int Iterations = 325;
        using (var rfc2898DeriveBytes = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(password, salt, Iterations))
            return rfc2898DeriveBytes.GetBytes(16);
    }

Change the salt and iteration parameters to other random numbers.

The byte length of the key is in my case 128bit(!) = 16 bytes (128/8), but you can use any other length supported by Rijndael (Key: 128, 192, 256 bit = 16, 24, 32 bytes). The IV is always 16 bytes!

share|improve this answer
2  
Oh dear, that code does not use a good key derivation function or a random IV. –  Maarten Bodewes Oct 9 '12 at 15:54
    
Thanks for the feedback. I haven't done much with encryption. I updatet the code with a function (found here: stackoverflow.com/questions/6482883/…) to generate a key with the password (password-based key derivation). I hope it's fine now. –  Janes Abou Chleih Oct 10 '12 at 5:45

If you want to use a password in your original zip file when uncompressing, then you will need to re-compress the files and add a password when doing so.

This link from the dotnetzip library documentation shows an easy way to zip with password encryption using that library.


Additional note about security:
Don't use the zip 2.0 encryption method if you care at all about encryption security as it is quite flawed. Instead use the AES 256-bit encryption.

Here is some example code(pulled directly from the link above) showing an implementation of the AES 256-bit encryption using the dotnetzip library with default level compression:

using (ZipFile zip = new ZipFile())
{
    zip.AddFile("ReadMe.txt"); // no password for this one
    zip.Password= "Cool.Hand.Luke!";
    zip.Encryption= EncryptionAlgorithm.WinZipAes256;
    zip.AddFile("Rawdata-2008-12-18.csv");
    zip.Save("Backup-AES-Encrypted.zip");
}

Edit: added clarification about original zip file
Edit 2: added code

share|improve this answer
    
Good recommendation. Love the password choice. :) –  Dan Feb 20 at 18:59

You can use DotNetZip (Ionic zip) as you mentioned, which supports setting password, providing zero level of compression:

using (ZipFile zip = new ZipFile())
  {
    zip.CompressionLevel = Ionic.Zlib.CompressionLevel.None;
    zip.AddFile(@"MyMusic\Messiah-01.mp3");
    zip.Save(ZipFileToCreate);
  }

So there's no overhead (compressing already compressed file) you just setting the password.

share|improve this answer
    
This will not put a password on his current zip, but create a new zip file with his current one inside the encrypted zip file. –  Scott Lemmon Oct 9 '12 at 8:24
    
Yes, it will be zip in zip, but as long as there no compression it will be fast as required. Also you can read existing zip using (ZipFile zip = ZipFile.Read("ExistingArchive.zip")) and add the password. Look on examples dotnetzip.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=CS-Examples –  Ivan Leonenko Oct 9 '12 at 8:29
    
I'm not sure, but I think if the file is significantly large this could increase the unzip time significantly, as it has to do the two processes (unencrypt and unzip) separately, opposed to together which should have significant optimizations implemented. –  Scott Lemmon Oct 9 '12 at 8:29
    
Updating with a password might be faster, but anyway it should be tested, it depends on implementation. –  Ivan Leonenko Oct 9 '12 at 8:36
1  
Ok... flaw in logic on my part there... compression must happen before encryption or virtually no compression can be done as discussed here: superuser.com/questions/260663/…. So the difference between the two methods should be trivial time wise, though I'm not sure if that is the case in actuality. –  Scott Lemmon Oct 9 '12 at 8:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.