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I am a beginner in C. I was trying to write some code that would carry out matrix multiplication using transpose. Is there any way I can improve the code in terms of execution time?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <assert.h>
#include <time.h>

int main()
{   

  int a[3][3] = {{1,0, 1}, {2, 2, 4},{1, 2, 3}};

        int b[3][3] ={ { 2, 3, 1}, { 6, 6, 2 }, { 9, 9, 0 } };
        int result[3][3];
        double tmp;
        int i,j,k;
        for (i=0; i<3; i++) //i = col
          {
            for (k=0; k<3; k++)
            {
              tmp = a[i][k];
              for (j=0; j<3; j++) //j = row
              {
                result[i][j] += tmp * b[k][j];
                printf("%d\t",result[i][j]);
              }
            }
          }
}
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the only way to improve the matrix multiplication is parallelization of code. e.g using Multi-threading, ILP, or GPGPU etc. –  sgar91 Oct 9 '12 at 7:45
    
Removing the printf would greatly improve the speed. (But I assume it is only there for debugging.) –  wallyk Oct 9 '12 at 7:46
    
@sgar91 oh we have not been taught that yet. But is my implementation of matrix multiplication using transpose correct? –  Bic B Oct 9 '12 at 7:46
    
@wallyk oh yes i am aware –  Bic B Oct 9 '12 at 7:47
2  
The implementation looks incorrect to me, you should initialize result to hold zero values. –  Steve Jessop Oct 9 '12 at 10:19
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your matrix is int, you really shouldn't use a double as a temporary. Converting integer to floating-point and back again for no purpose is very wasteful, it can cost a lot.

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Your implementation of matrix multiplication is wrong due to multiple reasons. Matrix multiplication is carried out by computing the inner product of every row of the first matrix with every column of second matrix, which is essentially missed out in your implementation. you are using temp variable which points to a[i][k], which remains unchanged through out the inner most loop. Row index of first matrix and column index of second matrix (or vice versa for transpose multiplication) has to be updated during the actual multiplication step. Also the result is incrementally added to a third matrix, which every element has to be initialized with 0 in languages like C to avoid the problem of junk values.

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One thing to try, which is very non-intuitive, is to de-optimize the source code and eliminate the explicit tmp:

for (i=0; i<3; i++)
    for (k=0; k<3; k++)
        for (j=0; j<3; j++) //j = row
        {
            result[i][j] += a[i][k] * b[k][j];
        }

This unties the compiler's hands somewhat and allows it to find common invariant sub-expressions on its own. It would move them outside the loop, perhaps also saving it using a faster paradigm (a register instead of a stack location).

Depending on the target CPU, a shrewd compiler with speed optimizations enabled might be able to parallel the CPU's pipelines by allocating independent registers and unrolling the inner loop(s). Of course, this all depends on you instructing the compiler to optimize (with an appropriate compiler option).

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Although beware that in this code, the compiler can see that result doesn't alias a, so it has at least the chance to hoist a[i][k] out of the loop, but you might be misled when you see it do so into thinking it always will. If you changed the code to a multiply function taking a, b and result as pointers then you would have to mark the pointers as restrict for the compiler to be allowed to hoist (unless of course multiply was inlined into a function where the fact of non-alias was known -- then that instance of multiply could hoist). –  Steve Jessop Oct 9 '12 at 10:15
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