Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Yesterday I was discussing this with a friend of mine and we didn't come to a conclusion. While testing, in our case with RSpec, boolean methods, I wondered what was the point of using:

it 'should process the payment' do
    payment.processed?.should eq(true)
end

The step had to check that the payment was processed, so I just went for:

it 'should process the payment' do
    payment.processed?
end

Now, I may be wrong on this but, steps act somehow like boolean methods that you want them to return true, so I wonder what's the point on checking that "true is true", I mean you already got the true there, right?

So, what do you think?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Steps aren't boolean methods that expect to return true. All the action happens within the should method - it performs the test and determines the success or failure.

That's why you can have multiple shoulds in one it block (although it's usually better not to, if you can avoid it).

For example:

it "doesn't use return values" do
  false.should be_true  # the test fails immediately here
  true.should be_true   # this never gets called
end

I would also suggest rewriting to use the be_processed method as suggested by tokland.

share|improve this answer

The idiomatic way to spec boolean methods (arbitrary predicates) is:

it 'should process the payment' do
  payment.should be_processed
end

Note that your second snippet doesn't call a rspec expectation so it's not testing anything (other that the code is successfully executed). I think you assumed that a it block checks its return value, but that's not the case.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, that's what I assumed, guess there's a lot to learn yet, thanks! :P –  Genís Oct 9 '12 at 8:14
 it "should process the payment" do
  payment.should be_processed
end

When you have a matcher of the form be_xxx then (unless there is something more specific setup) rspec will check that subject.xxx? is truthy.

If you have no calls to should in your spec then you're not testing anything: if processed? returned false the spec would pass

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.