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How do you combine multiple select count(*) from different table into one return?

I have a similar sitiuation as this post

but I want one return.

I tried Union all but it spit back 3 separate rows of count. How do you combine them into one?

select count(*) from foo1 where ID = '00123244552000258'
union all 
select count(*) from foo2 where ID = '00123244552000258'
union all
select count(*) from foo3 where ID = '00123244552000258'

Thanks

edit: I'm on MS SQL 2005

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7 Answers

up vote 32 down vote accepted
SELECT 
(select count(*) from foo1 where ID = '00123244552000258')
+
(select count(*) from foo2 where ID = '00123244552000258')
+
(select count(*) from foo3 where ID = '00123244552000258')

This is an easy way.

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Easy to understand and return just one. Thanks. - Jack –  Jack Aug 21 '09 at 16:11
1  
Do we know how efficient this is on large tables of data? –  JDandChips Feb 1 '13 at 14:49
    
The select count(*) should be based off an index on ID if available, and if one is not looking at the data it should be added. After that the addition is relatively simple. –  Chris J Mar 12 '13 at 13:22
    
Helpful answer. Thank you :) –  rikket Dec 11 '13 at 11:05
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select 
  (select count(*) from foo) as foo
, (select count(*) from bar) as bar
, ...
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I'm surprised no one has suggested this variation:

SELECT SUM(c)
FROM (
  SELECT COUNT(*) AS c FROM foo1 WHERE ID = '00123244552000258'
  UNION ALL
  SELECT COUNT(*) FROM foo2 WHERE ID = '00123244552000258'
  UNION ALL
  SELECT COUNT(*) FROM foo3 WHERE ID = '00123244552000258'
);
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Actually I see it's similar to the answer given by @Gren but this example is more concrete w.r.t. the OP's question. –  Bill Karwin Aug 14 '09 at 19:38
1  
This works on SQL Server Compact Edition whereas sub-queries in the SELECT statement will fail. –  Ryan Kirkman Mar 25 '13 at 5:17
    
But wouldn't union all be slower than just adding the results? As specified in Chris' answer? –  shabby May 26 '13 at 20:59
    
Hard to tell without testing them head to head on the same dataset and same hardware. –  Bill Karwin May 27 '13 at 0:08
    
@BillKarwin - good to know. is there any difference between the selected answer and your answer ? they seem to be the same to me. –  Borat Sagdiyev Mar 30 at 7:35
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Basically you do the counts as sub-queries within a standard select.

An example would be the following, this returns 1 row, two columns

SELECT
 (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM MyTable WHERE MyCol = 'MyValue') AS MyTableCount,
 (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM YourTable WHERE MyCol = 'MyValue') AS YourTableCount,
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You can combine your counts like you were doing before, but then you could sum them all up a number of ways, one of which is shown below:

SELECT SUM(A) 
FROM
(
    SELECT 1 AS A
    UNION ALL 
    SELECT 1 AS A
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 1 AS A
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 1 AS A
) AS B
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you could name all fields and add an outer select on those fields:

SELECT A, B, C FROM ( your initial query here ) TableAlias

That should do the trick.

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select sum(counts) from (
select count(1) as counts from foo 
union all
select count(1) as counts from bar)
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