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I have to store and manage a lot of information related to design themes. It could all be organized logically in two possible ways:

  1. A directory per each website user, with theme-relevant files stored in this directory. (Not many files per directory).

  2. A directory per theme, with all the relevant users' files in this. (Many themes and many users).

Every time a user logs in, relevant files have to fetched. My site is developed in PHP and hosted on CentOS. Is this question an important design question? Will either choice make a difference on storage and performance? Personally, I feel the first choice will be easier to follow.

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Large number of files in a directory makes it slow, you might consider adding subdirectories for every letter in between /files/a/n/t/ant.file –  Adder Oct 9 '12 at 8:28

2 Answers 2

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Large directories have a big overhead once they contain too many files (and the definition of "too many" is OS and filesystem-dependent; so generally you're far better going with larger numbers of directories (even nested with subdirectories) and fewer files in each... I typically try to use 100 files/directory as an upper limit

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The classical answer always was: Large directories drive your performance down.

However, we have 2012. The answer from the 80th's or 90th's is not necessarily longer a good one.

Here is a nice micro benchmark, done in the context of the LevelDB system. In that benchmark using ext3, it took 9ms to open a file in a directory with 1000 files, 10ms with 10,000 files, and 16ms with 100,000 files. But remember, reading and opening the extra directory takes some time, too.

In general, you should expect logarithmic grow when the number of files in a directory increases. Unless you use a extremely brain-dead file system, e.g. FAT32 or the configuration is messed up. However, when using tons of directories or a directory hierarchy, you also can expect asymptotically the same growth.

As a comparision, here is the general process:

Opening a file in a directory with a large number of files:

  • Crawl through the file system to find the directory inode. Even this may use multiple IOs but caching helps
  • Read directory inode
  • Find directory entry for a file. Every modern file system organizes the directory entries of a directory in some form of tree structure, e.g. even ext3 uses a H-Tree by default since 6 years or so. In larger directories this takes logorithmic number of steps, with a large branching factor.
  • Read file inode
  • Read file data

Opening a file in a directory with a small number of files, but with another layer of directories:

  • Crawl through the file system to find the parent directory inode. Even this may use multiple IOs but caching helps
  • Read parent directory inode
  • Find directory entry for a sub directory. Again, logarithmic, but maybe an IO less then with the alternative.
  • Read directory inode
  • Find the directory entry for the file itself. Again, logarithmic, but maybe an IO less then with the alternative.
  • Read file inode
  • Read file data

Asymptotically, it is not buying you anything for reading/writing data to split it up into a large number of directories.

[Edit:] W.r.t the proposal to build a directory hierarchy per letter of the word. This means you have a branching factor of at most 52, and probably a large skew in the file distribution. Some letters are more common and the directories contain much more files. The branching factor when using the implicit tree structure the file system, e.g. will be higher and the distribution will not be skewed. This significantly reduces the IOs. This is simply a bad idea when aiming for performance. If somebody really wants to do use a directory please, please consider hashing the data to directories to at least ensure a good data distribution.

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