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           var dateObj = new Date();
           var val = dateObj.getTime();
            //86400 * 1000 * 3  Each day is 86400 seconds
            var  days = 259200000;


        val = val + days;
        dateObj.setMilliseconds(val);
        val = dateObj.getMonth() + 1 + "/" + dateObj.getDate() + "/" + dateObj.getFullYear();
        alert(val);

I am trying to take the current date, add three days of milliseconds to it, and have the date stamp show 3 days later from the current. For example - if today is 10/09/2012 then I would like it to say 10/12/2012.

But this method is not working...I am getting months and days way off. Any suggestions?

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1  
I think you want setTime rather than setMilliseconds –  James Beilby Oct 9 '12 at 8:25
    
Try: dateObj.setTime(dateObj.getTime() + 8.64e7*3) but note daylight saving change overs may give unexpected results. Simpler to just add 3 to the date: dateObj.setDate(dateObj.getDate() + 3). –  RobG Oct 9 '12 at 8:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

To add time, get the current date then add, as milliseconds, the specific amount of time, then create a new date with the value:

// get the current date & time
var dateObj = Date.now();

// Add 3 days to the current date & time
//   I'd suggest using the calculated static value instead of doing inline math
//   I did it this way to simply show where the number came from
dateObj += 1000 * 60 * 60 * 24 * 3;

// create a new Date object, using the adjusted time
dateObj = new Date(dateObj);

To explain this further; the reason dataObj.setMilliseconds() doesn't work is because it sets the dateobj's milliseconds PROPERTY to the specified value(a value between 0 and 999). It does not set, as milliseconds, the date of the object.

// assume this returns a date where milliseconds is 0
dateObj = new Date();

dateObj.setMilliseconds(5);
console.log(dateObj.getMilliseconds()); // 5

// due to the set value being over 999, the engine assumes 0
dateObj.setMilliseconds(5000);
console.log(dateObj.getMilliseconds()); // 0
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I just var days = 259200000 since it is static and never changes. Thanks! Curious, why didn't setMilliseconds(days) do the same? –  dman Oct 10 '12 at 2:44
1  
I don't really know. I just know from experiance if it's static values, then do the calculations out like above. –  SReject Oct 10 '12 at 20:26
2  
Since this is (a year later) the first item to come up for adding milliseconds to a date, the reason setMilliseconds does not work is it sets the milliseconds portion of the date object. So, in normal operation, it expects a number from 0-999. However, it allows any number, and is like adding the value to the date without the previous milliseconds component of the date. –  Brian Lloyd Mar 14 '14 at 19:26

use this code

var dateObj = new Date(); 
           var val = dateObj.getTime(); 
            //86400 * 1000 * 3  Each day is 86400 seconds 
            var  days = 259200000; 


        val = val + days; 
        dateObj = new Date(val); // ********important*********//
        val = dateObj.getMonth() + 1 + "/" + dateObj.getDate() + "/" + dateObj.getFullYear(); 
        alert(val); 
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If you need to make date computations in javascript, use moment.js:

moment().add('days', 3).calendar();
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3  
No offense on to you, but suggesting the use of an entire library to preform such a simple task seems quite over doing it. –  SReject Oct 9 '12 at 8:26
3  
no offense, when someone else read my code, he will probably understand moment.js one line better than the accepted answer. –  Nicolas Modrzyk Oct 10 '12 at 23:38

Try this:

var dateObj = new Date(Date.now() + 86400000 * 3);

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