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I have a multifasta file with paired-end reads such that those adjacent to each other are mates (they have the same read name). I want to append "/1" and "/2" to the first and second read, respectively, throughout the file. I do not know how many reads are in the file. Here is how the file looks like(adding blank lines between reads for clarity):

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0 ACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTT CCCATTCCCCTAGGGCTGAGACCCAATATCCTCTATCCCTG

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0 GTGCAGGCATGTTGGGGCGTGTCTCAGAGCCTGAACTTCCCTTCCAGTCAGTGCTGGAAG GAGGTGGGCAGGGGAATGATAGAAAGGAAGGAGTGGATTGG

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0 ACAGCTATACACGAAGAATCTCAGCCCTTGTACTTTTGCATAGTCTCATACACGTATCAG AAGCCTCCACCTGGCTAACAGGAATTTGGGGCTTTGGGAGA

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0 TTTGGGAGATTTTTTAATCAGGGCAAAACCTGTACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTC CTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCC

And this is how I want it to appear:

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0/1 ACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTT CCCATTCCCCTAGGGCTGAGACCCAATATCCTCTATCCCTG

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0/2 GTGCAGGCATGTTGGGGCGTGTCTCAGAGCCTGAACTTCCCTTCCAGTCAGTGCTGGAAG GAGGTGGGCAGGGGAATGATAGAAAGGAAGGAGTGGATTGG

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0/1 ACAGCTATACACGAAGAATCTCAGCCCTTGTACTTTTGCATAGTCTCATACACGTATCAG AAGCCTCCACCTGGCTAACAGGAATTTGGGGCTTTGGGAGA

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0/2 TTTGGGAGATTTTTTAATCAGGGCAAAACCTGTACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTC CTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCC

I will then grep it, remove the "--" separator and save the forward reads (i.e.,those ending in "/1") and the reverse reads (i.e., those ending in "/2") in different files as follows:

grep -A 2 "/1" filename.fa | sed '/--/d' > reads_1.fa
grep -A 2 "/2" filename.fa | sed '/--/d' > reads_2.fa

I think this can be done with sed and awk but I haven't yet figured out how. Please help. Thanks in advance.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
awk 'BEGIN{i=1}{if($0~/#0/){print $0"/"i;if(i==1)i=2;else i=1;}else {print}}' your_file

tested below:

> cat temp
>HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0
ACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTT
CCCATTCCCCTAGGGCTGAGACCCAATATCCTCTATCCCTG
>HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0
GTGCAGGCATGTTGGGGCGTGTCTCAGAGCCTGAACTTCCCTTCCAGTCAGTGCTGGAAG
GAGGTGGGCAGGGGAATGATAGAAAGGAAGGAGTGGATTGG
>HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0
ACAGCTATACACGAAGAATCTCAGCCCTTGTACTTTTGCATAGTCTCATACACGTATCAG
AAGCCTCCACCTGGCTAACAGGAATTTGGGGCTTTGGGAGA
>HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0
TTTGGGAGATTTTTTAATCAGGGCAAAACCTGTACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTC
CTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCC

execution:

> awk 'BEGIN{i=1}{if($0~/#0/){print $0"/"i;if(i==1)i=2;else i=1;}else {print}}' temp
>HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0/1
ACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTT
CCCATTCCCCTAGGGCTGAGACCCAATATCCTCTATCCCTG
>HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0/2
GTGCAGGCATGTTGGGGCGTGTCTCAGAGCCTGAACTTCCCTTCCAGTCAGTGCTGGAAG
GAGGTGGGCAGGGGAATGATAGAAAGGAAGGAGTGGATTGG
>HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0/1
ACAGCTATACACGAAGAATCTCAGCCCTTGTACTTTTGCATAGTCTCATACACGTATCAG
AAGCCTCCACCTGGCTAACAGGAATTTGGGGCTTTGGGAGA
>HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0/2
TTTGGGAGATTTTTTAATCAGGGCAAAACCTGTACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTC
CTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCC
> 
share|improve this answer
    
I found this easier to understand than the one by @Kent but both work. Thanks! –  Tjb LaMac Oct 9 '12 at 11:38

Using sed to generate the intermediate file:

#!/bin/sed -f

1 {
    x
    s/^$/\\1/
    x
}
/^HWI/ {
    G
    s/\n//
    x
    y/12/21/
    x
}

In a single line:

sed -e '1{x;s/^$/\\1/;x};/^HWI/{G;s/\n//;x;y/12/21/;x}'

The commands are quite simple. The commands grouped in the first pair of braces are executed for the first line, and they initialize the hold space (an auxiliary buffer) with \1. To do this, we swap the contents of the pattern space (working buffer) with that of the hold space with the x exchange command. Then we replace an empty line with \1, and then swap the spaces again.

The commands grouped in the second pair of braces are executed for every line that starts with HWI. First we append the contents of the hold space into the pattern space. Because it is appended starting with a newline character, the next command removes it. Now we have to swap the number from 1 to 2 and from 2 to 1. First we swap the contents of the spaces again, and then use the y command to swap characters. It defines that when a 1 or a 2 is found, they must be replaced with a 2 or a 1, respectively. Finally, we restore the contents of the spaces.

You can also write a single script to do everything, separating them into the files:

#!/bin/sed -f

/^HWI/! d

:start_forward
s/$/\\1/

:forward
w reads_1.fa
n
/^HWI/! b forward

s/$/\\2/

:reverse
w reads_2.fa
n
/^HWI/! b reverse

b start_forward

In a shorter form:

sed -e '/^HWI/!d;:s;s/$/\\1/;:f;wreads_1.fa
    n;/^HWI/!bf;s/$/\\2/;:r;wreads_2.fa
    n;/^HWI/!br;bs'

Here we start by ignoring all lines until we find a line that starts with HWI. Then we have to loops, one for writing the forward data and another for the backward data. Between the loops there are commands for appending the respective \1 or \2 before writing the line to the respective file. The loops are analogous, they simple write the line to their respective file, load a new line from the input and check if it is a line starting with HWI, indicating that it should go to the next loop.

A more thorough explanation:

The first command is executed when the line doesn't start with HWI (we negate the match by adding a ! right after it). The command is d to delete a line, and also force sed to load the next line and restart the script. Effectively, we loop until we find a string that starts with HWI.

Now, we use the : command to define a label called start_forward. A label is nothing more than an name to a location in the script to where we can jump to. If we keep jumping between labels and never reach the end of the script, we'll end up never restarting the script, so the first command never gets executed after the first line that starts with HWI is found. The first thing we do is append the \1 to the end of the line.

Now we define a new label, called forward which will be used to jump back when we loop through the lines. The loop is quite simple, first we write the current line to the respective file reads_1.fa using the w command, then we use the n line to read the next line into pattern space, and finally we check if the newly read line start with HWI. If it doesn't, we execute the b branch command to jump back to the forward label, allowing us to start another iteration of the loop.

If the lines does start with HWI, we now must go to the other loop. Before though, we must append the line with \2. The loop is analogous to the previous one, except that when we exit the loop when another HWI line is found, we must branch back to the start_forward label with the b command in order to switch back to the previous loop.

Hope this helps =)

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This adds /0 and /1 to the reads:

perl -pe 'if (/#0/) { $x = 1 - $x; s:#0:#0/$x: }'
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I preferred the awk solutions because I am trying to improve my "awk-fu". Thanks! –  Tjb LaMac Oct 9 '12 at 11:39

awk one-liner:

 awk -F'#' 'NF==2{a[$1]=($1 in a)?++a[$1]:1;$0=$0"/"a[$1];}1' file

test

kent$  cat t.txt
HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0
ACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTT 
CCCATTCCCCTAGGGCTGAGACCCAATATCCTCTATCCCTG

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0
GTGCAGGCATGTTGGGGCGTGTCTCAGAGCCTGAACTTCCCTTCCAGTCAGTGCTGGAAG 
GAGGTGGGCAGGGGAATGATAGAAAGGAAGGAGTGGATTGG

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0
ACAGCTATACACGAAGAATCTCAGCCCTTGTACTTTTGCATAGTCTCATACACGTATCAG 
AAGCCTCCACCTGGCTAACAGGAATTTGGGGCTTTGGGAGA

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0
TTTGGGAGATTTTTTAATCAGGGCAAAACCTGTACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTC 
CTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCC

kent$  awk -F'#' 'NF==2{a[$1]=($1 in a)?++a[$1]:1;$0=$0"/"a[$1];}1' t.txt
HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0/1
ACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTT 
CCCATTCCCCTAGGGCTGAGACCCAATATCCTCTATCCCTG

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0/2
GTGCAGGCATGTTGGGGCGTGTCTCAGAGCCTGAACTTCCCTTCCAGTCAGTGCTGGAAG 
GAGGTGGGCAGGGGAATGATAGAAAGGAAGGAGTGGATTGG

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0/1
ACAGCTATACACGAAGAATCTCAGCCCTTGTACTTTTGCATAGTCTCATACACGTATCAG 
AAGCCTCCACCTGGCTAACAGGAATTTGGGGCTTTGGGAGA

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0/2
TTTGGGAGATTTTTTAATCAGGGCAAAACCTGTACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTC 
CTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCC
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You have what's called a shuffled multifasta. You can use GNU awk to unshuffle it and create two files. Note that there's no need to use grep or sed to perform any post-processing. This code will create two files for you:

awk 'NR%4==1 { getline one; printf "%s/1\n%s\n", $0, one > "reads_1.fa" } NR%4==3 { getline two; printf "%s/2\n%s\n", $0, two > "reads_2.fa" }' file.txt

Input:

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0
ACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCCCCTAGGGCTGAGACCCAATATCCTCTATCCCTG
HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0
GTGCAGGCATGTTGGGGCGTGTCTCAGAGCCTGAACTTCCCTTCCAGTCAGTGCTGGAAGGAGGTGGGCAGGGGAATGATAGAAAGGAAGGAGTGGATTGG
HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0
ACAGCTATACACGAAGAATCTCAGCCCTTGTACTTTTGCATAGTCTCATACACGTATCAGAAGCCTCCACCTGGCTAACAGGAATTTGGGGCTTTGGGAGA
HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0
TTTGGGAGATTTTTTAATCAGGGCAAAACCTGTACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCC

Results:

Contents of reads_1.fa:

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0/1
ACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCCCCTAGGGCTGAGACCCAATATCCTCTATCCCTG
HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0/1
ACAGCTATACACGAAGAATCTCAGCCCTTGTACTTTTGCATAGTCTCATACACGTATCAGAAGCCTCCACCTGGCTAACAGGAATTTGGGGCTTTGGGAGA

Contents of reads_2.fa:

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0/2
GTGCAGGCATGTTGGGGCGTGTCTCAGAGCCTGAACTTCCCTTCCAGTCAGTGCTGGAAGGAGGTGGGCAGGGGAATGATAGAAAGGAAGGAGTGGATTGG
HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0/2
TTTGGGAGATTTTTTAATCAGGGCAAAACCTGTACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCC
share|improve this answer
    
You didn't test your code otherwise you would have realized that it adds "/1" even to the sequence! –  Tjb LaMac Oct 9 '12 at 11:24
    
@TjbLaMac: I used an actual shuffled fasta, like the one you describe without the empty lines you added for 'clarity'. Code has been tested. –  Steve Oct 9 '12 at 11:36
    
@TjbLaMac: Please see the edit. HTH. –  Steve Oct 9 '12 at 11:42
    
Alright. That's cool! Thanks! –  Tjb LaMac Oct 9 '12 at 11:42

Another solution:

awk 'BEGIN{RS=""}{if(NR<3){sub(/#0/,"#0/"NR);print $0,"\n"}else{NR=1;sub(/#0/,"#0/"NR);print $0,"\n"}}' file

Result:

awk 'BEGIN{RS=""}{if(NR<3){sub(/#0/,"#0/"NR); print $0,"\n"}else{NR=1;sub(/#0/,"#0/"NR);print $0, "\n"}}' file 
HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0/1 
ACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTCCTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTT 
CCCATTCCCCTAGGGCTGAGACCCAATATCCTCTATCCCTG 

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10007:34134#0/2 
GTGCAGGCATGTTGGGGCGTGTCTCAGAGCCTGAACTTCCCTTCCAGTCAGTGCTGGAAG 
GAGGTGGGCAGGGGAATGATAGAAAGGAAGGAGTGGATTGG 

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0/1 
ACAGCTATACACGAAGAATCTCAGCCCTTGTACTTTTGCATAGTCTCATACACGTATCAG 
AAGCCTCCACCTGGCTAACAGGAATTTGGGGCTTTGGGAGA 

HWI-ST1018:1:1101:10016:6488#0/2 
TTTGGGAGATTTTTTAATCAGGGCAAAACCTGTACTAGTAACCACATGTCCAGACTCCTC 
CTATGCTCCCACCCAGGGTCCCTTGAGCTGCTTCCCATTCC 
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