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function condition(){ 
  this.expression = ""; 
  this.toString = function(){
    return this.expression;
  }
};

function and(first, second){
    this.expression = first + " and " + second;
}

function nop(){};
nop.prototype = condition.prototype;

and.prototype = new nop();

var a =new and(1,2);

console.log(a.toString());

it is expected to see "1 and 2" as output but this is what happened: "[object Object]"

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are transfering the prototype of condition to nop's prototype. The problem is that your condition.toString is not declared in the prototype... Here:

function condition(){ 
  this.expression = ""; 

};
  condition.prototype.toString = function(){
    return this.expression;
  }
function and(first, second){
    this.expression = first + " and " + second;
}

function nop(){};
nop.prototype = condition.prototype;

and.prototype = new nop();

var a =new and(1,2);

console.log(a.toString());

OR

function condition(){ 
  this.expression = ""; 
  this.toString = function(){
    return this.expression;
  }
};

function and(first, second){
    this.expression = first + " and " + second;
}

function nop(){};
nop = condition;

and.prototype = new nop();

var a =new and(1,2);

console.log(a.toString());
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you aren't overriding the toString method, because the constructer of condition is never called! try doing this;

condition.prototype.toString=function(){
    return this.expression;
}
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try passing strings into your and function, as at the moment you are trying to concatenate integers to a string var a =new and("1","2");

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it should be like this

function condition(){ 
  this.expression = ""; 
};    

condition.prototype.toString = function(){
   return this.expression;
}
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Ok, so the problem here is you are mixing two inheritance patterns (http://davidshariff.com/blog/javascript-inheritance-patterns/) the pseudo-classical with the functional patterns.

You can create an object by adding methods on the constructor function:

function MyClass() {
    var privateProperty = 1;
    this.publicProperty = 2;

    function pivateMethod() {
        // some code ...
    }

    this.publicMethod = function() {
        // some code ...
    };
}

// inheritance
function SubClass() {
    MyClass.call(this);

    this.newMethod = function() { };
}

Here when you create a instance of this class you are creating every method again.

Then you have the prototype pattern:

function MyClass() {
    this._protectedProperty = 1;
    this.publicProperty = 2;
}
MyClass.prototype._protectedMethod = function() {
    // some code ...
};
MyClass.prototype.publicMethod = function() {
    // some code ...
};

// inheritance
function SubClass() {
    MyClass.call(this);
}
SubClass.prototype = new MyClass();
SubClass.prototype.newMethod = function() { };

// OR
function SubClass() {
    MyClass.call(this);
}

function dummy() { }
dummy.prototype = MyClass.prototype;
SubClass.prototype = new dummy();
SubClass.prototype.newMethod = function() { };

Yhen you must choose one of those two patterns, not both·

I've fixed your code on this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/dz6Ch/

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